Caption

Timothy’s expansion, inside and out, is complete

Interior and energy-related renovation work at Timothy’s Bar on Brown Street is now complete.

Recall that last year, a building permit was filed with the city of Dayton for $300,000 in alterations at the 1818 Brown St. building.

Recent work on the favorite University of Dayton bar and hangout included a second-floor lounge area, a new front patio, high efficiency lighting, windows, HVAC and appliances.

MORETrump talks up Air Force One redesign, which is managed at Wright-Patterson 

Renovations were completed through a public-private partnership with the Ohio PACE program that helps companies finance these kind of improvements, according to Greenworks Lending, which helped finance the project.

Recommended for you

Recommended for you

Recommended for you

Most read

  1. 1 Pike County murders: Court docs give insight into custody battle
  2. 2 Dayton Flyers survive test from Purdue Fort Wayne to reach 3-0
  3. 3 Pike County murders: Grandmother suspects appear in court

According to Greenworks:

• The total financed amount for the energy-focused portion of work at Timothy’s was $230,387.

• The property owner will save 98,572 kilowatt hours in lifetime expected energy savings.

MOREArea manufacturer plans to invest, add jobs 

Darien, Conn.-based Greenworks Lending helps companies secure financing for commercial property assessed clean energy (also called “PACE”) projects.

Jessica Bailey, chief executive and co-founder of Greenworks, said the work will make the bar more energy efficient. “It was a whole range of measures,” she said in an interview.

These projects can be expensive up front, which leads some business owners to try to avoid them, Bailey said.

But that can be a mistake, she said. Through PACE financing, the money does not have to come out of pocket immediately. And the repayment structure is very long term, which is one thing entrepreneurs like about PACE financing, she added.

“Presumably, (Timothy’s owner) Marty (Brown) has better things to do with his own capital,” Bailey said. Instead, Timothy’s can use its capital to invest in, say, a new pool table or some other feature.

Said Bailey: “He can use our money to sort of do things that are invisible but important.”

She said this project is a good example of a “main street application of this financing tool.”

In 2016, Timothy’s got updates to its exterior including the addition of a patio.

“This is the type of bar that many of us went to in college,” Bailey said.

More from Daytondailynews