New trial date set in case of Dayton father accused of killing Takoda Collins

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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Takoda Collins video

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

A trial that was set to begin this month in the case of a father accused of killing his 10-year-old son has been vacated and a new date has been set.

Al-Mutahan McLean is now due back in court in September. McLean is accused of killing Takoda Collins. Authorities have said in court documents that Takoda suffered “extreme abuse” before his death.

Takoda was pronounced dead on Dec. 13, 2019.

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Prosecutor Mat Heck Jr. said in a previous release that Takoda was tortured both mentally and physically for years.

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McLean, 32, is charged with murder, involuntary manslaughter, felonious assault, rape, kidnapping and endangering children. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

A trial in the case was set for April 26. During a motion to suppress hearing last month, Montgomery County Judge Dennis Adkins began continuing the trial to September before McLean called his attorney over to him and told the court that he didn’t wish to delay.

Exactly what took place that prompted the postponement is unclear as restrictions have been put into place to bar the public from accessing court documents, and a gag order has been issued in the case that prevents the lawyers from talking about the case with the press.

Al-Mutahan McLean
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Al-Mutahan McLean

Meanwhile, the trial against Amanda Hinze, McLean’s girlfriend, who is also charged in connection to the boy’s death, is also set to go in September. Hinze faces involuntary manslaughter, kidnapping and child endangering charges in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court.

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Both defendants have pleaded not guilty in the case, and both remain in the Montgomery County Jail on $1 million bond.

A final pre-trial in McLean’s hearing will be set in the case at a later date, according to the court.

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