Amy Kollar Anderson on TV and beer

Artist stretches after leaving Rosewood.

The Dayton area is exploding with local breweries. It has also been a hotbed of artistic talent. Marry the two, and what do you have? “ART HOPS” is the brainchild of local artist/entrepreneur Amy Kollar Anderson.

She talks with creative individuals while drinking regional brews in a video format. When she was a guest on a DATV show this past March, Bob Klaar saw potential for a show with an artistic theme.

“He knew I had been the gallery coordinator at Rosewood (Arts Centre in Kettering) and said, ‘You must know a lot of artists, would you like to host your own TV show?’ ” remembers Kollar Anderson. “I said OK, but I want to do something that’s uniquely my own.”

Two of Kollar Anderson’s passions are art and beer. That became the concept for her show. Three thirty-minute episodes are already in the bag: “Creativity and Healing,” the Artwork of Tiffany Clark; “Outside Your Comfort Zone” with Rodney Veal; and “Mashing Genres” with Rob E. Boley. She interviews creative people from multiple disciplines: Clark is a visual artist, Veal is a dancer, and Boley is a writer.

In the premier video program with Clark, they were drinking Black Tonic from the Toxic Brew Company. The interview was a give-and-take about Clark’s 2-D artwork, her drawing techniques, and how creating art is a type of therapy for her. The artist with red highlights in her hair and wooden cat-eye glasses seemed comfortable in front of the camera.

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“I’ve encountered a lot of artwork during nine years as the past director of Rosewood gallery, and I think her work is really unique,” said Kollar Anderson, who departed in June of 2014 to focus solely on her own artwork.

Kollar Anderson turned to dance for Episode 2, with Rodney Veal, a dancer/choreographer who talked about his involvement with the Blue Sky Project. He was one of five artists chosen for the artist residency program at U.D. to mentor high school students and one college intern for a collaborative work. They were drinking Ermal’s from Warped Wing Brewing Company.

The next stop on the production schedule was reserved for a writer. Boley’s interview took place on location, drinking Thunderballs at the Eudora Brewing Company. He talked about genre mashing, where he mixed classic horror monsters with classic Fairy Tales. His first two books in the series are “that RISEN snow,” and “that WICKED apple.”

Episode 4, with photographer Bill Franz, was shot on location at Mankato Farms in New Carlisle. There were some technical difficulties, but the episode may be up on the website soon. For Episode 5, Kollar Anderson has planned an interview with Lisa Wolters, a potter and also a brewmaster. That show should be up on the site within 10 days.

“The show is going really well. It’s been an interesting learning experience for me,” said Kollar Anderson. “Selecting the guests, being aware of the camera but also being spontaneous are some of the things I’m trying to do during the show.”

As far as her artwork is concerned, (as of press deadline) she was set to unveil four collaborative works with Robert Walker at Clash Consignments on Sept. 4. She will have a solo show, “XO NUMIA,” at Wittenberg University in November, with an artist talk at 4 p.m. on Nov. 18.

“It’s been just over a year now when I left Rosewood. This whole year has been about getting out of my comfort zone,” said Kollar Anderson. “I’m learning a lot about myself that I didn’t anticipate. I thought being home alone in my studio would be my dream world, but I got really lonely.”

Now she just surrounds herself with like-minded people.

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