Dayton to appeal FAA-proposed $167K civil penalty on airport

Firefighters with the Dayton International Airport Fire Department look on as their crash truck sprays down a live training fire Oct. 5 at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department assisted the DIA Fire Department in refresher training required for Federal Aviation Administration certification. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

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Firefighters with the Dayton International Airport Fire Department look on as their crash truck sprays down a live training fire Oct. 5 at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department assisted the DIA Fire Department in refresher training required for Federal Aviation Administration certification. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Airport ‘did not have adequate aircraft rescue and fire fighting vehicles in service’ on one day, FAA says

The city of Dayton faces a potential hefty fine for what the Federal Aviation Administration says was a failure to have adequate rescue and firefighting vehicles ready for service on a certain day last year.

The FAA proposed a $167,343 civil penalty against Dayton for “allegedly allowing seven flights to arrive and depart on Feb. 13, 2020, while (James) M. Cox International Airport did not have adequate aircraft rescue and fire fighting vehicles in service,” the FAA said in a statement Monday.

The FAA further alleges the airport did not notify the FAA or air carriers of this vehicle shortage as required by the Airport Certification Manual, the government also said.

In a statement released Tuesday, the city said: “The FAA did issue the city of Dayton Department of Aviation a notice of proposed civil penalty. The notice of proposed civil penalty has a provision that allows the city of Dayton Department of Aviation 30 days to appeal.

The city said it will appeal. “The city of Dayton will release the results of the appeal hearing once a final determination has been made by the FAA regarding this issue,” the city said in its statement.

The Dayton Fire Fighters union (IAFF Local 136) did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Federal rules set minimum Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting vehicle requirements (ARFF), as part of Certification of Airport guidelines. The requirements define the vehicles needed “to transport a specific quantity(ies) and type(s) of fire fighting agents” according to federal code.

Aviation officials say the airport has five divisions: aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF); police; planning and engineering; operations and facilities maintenance; and administration and finance.

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