Trotwood tax levy narrowly fails; Centerville, others pass

Mayor Mary McDonald and members of Trotwood city council discuss an income tax levy for the May ballot on Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022. AIMEE HANCOCK / STAFF

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Mayor Mary McDonald and members of Trotwood city council discuss an income tax levy for the May ballot on Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022. AIMEE HANCOCK / STAFF

Trotwood’s five-year, 0.5% income tax levy for road improvements was narrowly rejected Tuesday, according to final, unofficial results from the Montgomery County Board of Elections. The vote was 51.8% against the levy and 48.2% for.

Provisional ballots and valid late-arriving absentee ballots will still be counted in the coming days, and the election will be officially certified in late May.

Trotwood’s current local income tax rate is 2.25%, which generates about $4.7 million annually. An increase to 2.75%, if approved, would have generated around $1 million per year in additional revenue for Trotwood, city officials say. The city had planned to pave about 5.4 lane miles of road each year if the levy had passed.

Centerville school district voters approved a 10-year, 4.53-mill renewal property tax levy for regular operating expenses, according to final, unofficial results Tuesday. The vote was 59.9% for the levy and 40.1% against it.

Centerville taxpayers are already paying for the levy, which generates about $9.55 million annually in the district’s budget, and the school district asked residents to renew it for another 10 years.

Centerville taxpayers will continue to pay $138.73 per year per $100,000 of property value for the levy, according to the Montgomery County Auditor’s Office. The levy goes to operating costs, like teachers, classroom materials and utilities.

ExploreLevies, income taxes set for May ballot

Valley View area JEDD vote

Residents of Germantown, Farmersville, German Twp. and Jackson Twp. — all of which feed into the Valley View school district — voted to approve a joint economic development district, or JEDD, according to final, unofficial results. Jackson Twp. voters backed the JEDD at 59.8% in favor and German Twp. 56.5% in favor.

The JEDD is a structure to allow those four jurisdictions to levy income tax specifically on the parcel of land where the new Valley View school campus will go in German Twp.

Under the JEDD, all of the school employees working at the new campus would pay the new JEDD income tax rate, proceeds of which would be divvied up by the four communities.

Other Valley View area tax levies

  • German Twp.: Township officials asked voters to approve a 1-mill renewal levy for Germantown Senior Center. It costs $25.98 per $100,000 in property tax valuation yearly and generates $177,938. In final, unofficial results, 55% of voters voted for the levy, and 45% voted against it.
  • Farmersville Village: Voters were asked to approve a 2.5-mill renewal levy that goes to the public works department, according to village officials. That levy costs $59.43 per $100,000 in property tax valuation yearly, according to the auditor’s office, and it generates $36,132 annually. With final, unofficial results, 71.50% voted for the levy, while 28.50% voted against the levy.
  • Jackson Twp.: Jackson Twp. had two renewal property tax levies on the May ballot. The township asked voters to approve a 4-year, 2-mill renewal for streets, roads and bridges. According to final, unofficial results, 63.45% of voters have voted for the levy, while 36.55% of voters have voted against the levy. The township also asked voters to renew a 1-mill property tax levy, for 5 years, for park improvements. According to partial unofficial results, 62.36% of voters have voted for the levy, while 37.64% of voters have voted against the levy.

Franklin City charter

Franklin voters were deciding on six separate charter changes Tuesday, all of which were approved, most by large margins. The closest outcome of the six amendments was for the charter eliminating the raised requirements for the city to bid and provide several public notices of all sales, leases and other interests in city-owned properties, with 54.81% voting for the amendment and 45.19% voting against.

The other five amendments will allow the city to make advertisement notices and city laws available virtually, to update audit requirements, to update ballot measure requirements, and to allow heads of departments to consider lateral candidates for certain positions.

ExploreEarlier story: Franklin, Xenia will vote on charter amendments

Xenia charter changes

While Franklin voters decided on each item individually, Xenia residents cast a single vote for or against three changes. According to final, unofficial results, 75.50% of voters have voted for these charter amendments, while 24.50% of voters have voted against them.

The three changes will: differentiate between ordinances and resolutions and require two readings of each, adjust details for charter-created boards and commissions and change the title of an article on civil service requirements.

Other issues:

  • Phillipsburg Village: Village voters approved a new 3-mill property tax levy, for road improvements, according to final, unofficial results. This is a permanent levy, and will cost a homeowner an extra $105 per year on a $100,000 home. The vote was 55.17% for the levy and 44.83% against it.
  • Washington Twp.: The township asked residents to renew a street and roads levy that costs about $46 per $100,000 in property valuation and generates more than $2 million annually. With final, unofficial results, 70.13% of voters voted for the levy, and 29.87% voted against it.
  • Miami Twp.: The township has two related issues on the May ballot. The township is seeking the authority to aggregate retail electric and natural gas loads. From final, unofficial results, about 64% of voters had cast ballots in support of each measure.

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