Miamisburg judge who suggested drug treatment over incarceration dies at 68

Judge Robert Rettich III, a Miamisburg judge whose efforts helped combat drug issues in the community, died Monday at 68 years old.

“Throughout his career, Judge Rettich always encouraged substance abuse treatment, and other behavioral educational programs, as opposed to incarceration, when appropriate,” reads his obituary on Dalton Funeral Home’s website. “He was a strong advocate of intervention, and was always eager to help people become more knowledgeable about the law and live within the confines of it.”

A lifelong Germantown resident and 1971 graduate of Valley View High School, Rettich earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Miami University in Oxford in 1975. He earned his Juris Doctorate from University of Dayton School of Law, and was admitted to practice in 1978.

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Prior to his election as Miamisburg Municipal Court Judge, Rettich managed a private law practice for more than 38 years. During his career, Judge Rettich served as city, village, acting and special prosecutor for multiple area courts, served as an arbitrator for Montgomery County Common Pleas Court, and served as the law director for the Village of Farmersville for more than 30 years.

Rettich was involved in his community via everything from Boy Scouts and neighborhood watch meetings, to serving on Emmanuel’s Lutheran Church’s council and speaking at area Drug Abuse Resistance Education graduations.

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A memorial visitation is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. March 12 at Emmanuel’s Lutheran Church, 30 W. Warren St., Germantown, followed by a Celebration of Life at 2:30 p.m. Pastors Terry Morgan and Bonny Kinnunen will officiate.

The service will be livestreamed at www.elcgermantown.org/live-streaming. A funeral procession will follow. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Emmanuel’s Lutheran Church or Boy Scout Troop #29. Condolences may be shared at daltonfh.net.

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