Amazon, Sears to partner on another online deal

Sears stores like this location in the Mall at Fairfield Commons now offer online ordering stations for Sears merchandise as a reaction to market forces.
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Sears stores like this location in the Mall at Fairfield Commons now offer online ordering stations for Sears merchandise as a reaction to market forces.

Sears and Amazon have announced a deal for customers who buy tires online.

Drivers who purchased their tires from Amazon can now have them installed and balanced at their local Sears Auto Center, the companies announced today. The service, which will allow customers to have their tires shipped directly to an auto center, will be rolled out over the next few weeks.

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The tire partnership will at first be available at 47 Sears Auto Centers in eight metropolitan areas including Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., according to Sears. After the initial roll-out, Sears and Amazon will expand the deal to more than 400 locations.

Sears has auto centers at Fairfield Commons in Beavercreek, at the Upper Valley Mall in Springfield, at Northgate Mall in Cincinnati and on Polaris Parkway in Columbus. A Sears Auto Center at the Dayton Mall was closed last year and will be remade into an Outback Steakhouse.

The tire deal is just the latest partnership between the two retailers. Last July, Amazon began selling Sears’ Kenmore appliances, according to the companies.
Sears has closed a number of its Ohio stores in recent years, as the retailer struggles to keep up with changes in consumer shopping trends. Kmart is also owned by Sears and the last Kmart store in Dayton closed in September.

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