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Austin Landing’s growth is bringing more funds for area cities. Here’s what it means.

Business growth near the Austin Boulevard interchange of Interstate 75 continues to bolster tax revenue for Miami Twp.’s joint ventures with cities.

The Austin Center Joint Economic Development District saw income taxes increase about 21 percent and hotel/motel taxes jump by 29 percent from the previous year, boosting this year’s tax revenues to about $1.025 million and topping 2017’s numbers by more than 15 percent, records show.

The Austin Center JEDD is one of three the township has with partnering cities. The other two – named Dayton and Miami Crossing – combined to bring in slightly more tax revenue than did Austin Center, home to Austin Landing.

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“The JEDDs are important to create revenue streams that can fund efforts throughout the community.” Miami Twp. Board of Trustees President John Morris said.

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“So we’re thankful that we have the opportunity these. They help fund roads; they help fund parks – and the overall general services that we’re allowed to offer the community.”

Miami Twp.’s tax sharing deals with Dayton, Miamisburg and Springboro brought in about $2.19 million for 2018, topping the $2 million mark for the second straight year, according to township records.

Combined revenues for 2017 were about $2.1 million, records show. The totals reflect the number of jobs in and around the business and entertainment corridors of the Dayton Mall and Austin Landing, as well as the Dayton-owned airport.

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For 2018, the respective JEDD boards of directors disbursed about $1.26 million to the township. Miamisburg – a partner in two of the agreements — received $373,298.

“That helps,” said Miamisburg Mayor Dick Church, Jr. “It’s a win-win for both of us, the township and the city. The township is doing most of the day to day enforcement … we are handling the financial end of it.”

The Austin Center JEDD includes Miamisburg and Springboro. The income tax rate is 2.25 percent with the township receiving about 57 percent, Miamisburg about 22 percent and Springboro about 20 percent.

The Austin Center JEDD board disbursed $900,000 in revenue this year, giving the township about $513,000 while Miamisburg collected about $198,000 and Springboro about $180,000.

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Miami Crossing, which includes the township and Miamisburg, also has a 2.25 percent income tax rate. The township gets 70 percent of tax revenues and the city 30 percent.

The Miami Crossing JEDD brought in about $830,000 this year and disbursed slightly less than $615,000.

The Dayton JEDD, which includes Dayton and the township, is taxed at 1.75 percent and the revenue is split 50/50 between the jurisdictions.

That JEDD’s total tax revenue was about $328,000 with the township and Dayton each getting $138.402 in disbursements, according to township records.

-MORE COVERAGE ON THIS ISSUE:

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