DeWine, Ohio first lady test negative for the coronavirus

Governor says president’s diagnosis a powerful reminder the virus does not discriminate

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and first lady Fran DeWine tested negative Friday for the coronavirus.

Following President Donald Trump’s announcement that he and his wife, first lady Melania Trump, tested positive for the virus — which followed recent visits to Ohio — the DeWines were tested as well. Lt. Gov. Jon Husted also tested negative.

ExploreDeWine urges anyone who attended local Trump events to get tested for COVID-19

The Trumps were in Ohio this week for the presidential debate Tuesday night in Cleveland. The president also was at the Dayton International Airport on Sept. 21 for a campaign stop and on Wednesday, his son Donald Trump Jr. was in Tipp City.

Trump Jr., along with the rest of the first family, has not been diagnosed with the virus, according to the White House.

ExplorePresident Trump, Trump Jr. made campaign stops in Dayton area days before diagnosis

The governor said the president and his wife were in his and Fran’s thoughts.

“We think about them, we think about everyone who is battling COVID in our country and across the world,” DeWine said.

The governor also said the Trumps diagnoses serve as a powerful reminder that the virus does not discriminate, that people need to protect themselves by wearing masks and practicing social distancing, as well as other coronavirus prevention guidelines.

The governor had a coronavirus scare another time Trump visited Ohio.

DeWine tested negative for the virus in his second test on Aug. 7 following a positive result during a required screening to meet Trump at an event in Cleveland. The first test was a rapid test and the second was a more traditional test. He and the first lady had already begun to quarantine for 14 days on their Greene County farm when they learned of their negative status.

ExploreWhat we know about President Trump testing positive for coronavirus

Husted during the Friday afternoon press conference responded to questions about people at the presidential debate in Cleveland on Tuesday not wearing masks.

Husted, who attended the debate, said that to enter the venue people were tested for the virus, had their temperatures taken and had to wear a mask.

He also said that most people in his sightline were wearing masks at the debate.

Husted released a statement earlier Friday saying that he did not come into contact with the president, his staff or the Trump family. He also was wearing a mask for the debate and was seated “at least 50 feet away” from the stage.

DeWine said to his knowledge the state has not been contacted by the White House in regards to contact tracing.

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