Airport zoning changes specify guidelines for digital billboard

Key Ads of Dayton has plans to build a digital billboard at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport. The proposal calls for the billboard to be 22 feet, 4 inches high, 40 feet long and five feet wide. CONTRIBUTED

caption arrowCaption
Key Ads of Dayton has plans to build a digital billboard at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport. The proposal calls for the billboard to be 22 feet, 4 inches high, 40 feet long and five feet wide. CONTRIBUTED

Changes specifying where a digital billboard can be built at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport have been approved and an outdoor advertising company expects to begin construction this year.

A gateway billboard at the airport for Miami Twp. is proposed by Key-Ads of Dayton along Ohio 741 near the Montgomery/Warren County line.

Plans call for the billboard to be 22 feet, 4 inches high, 40 feet long and five feet wide. It will provide community messages as well as serve to alert passersby that they are entering or leaving the township, according to Nick Keyes Jr., company vice president.

RELATED: Change dramatic near Austin Boulevard and airport since initially planning

“With the public’s media consumption habits changing rapidly, Key-Ads Gateway Features are an excellent way to reach the community for our advertisers,” Keyes said in an email.

“The township receives free community messages provided by Key-Ads as well as amber alerts and emergency messaging,” he added.

Keyes said his company expects to erect the billboard this year after township trustees approved language changes last week to clarify outdoor advertising signage guidelines within the airport’s new zoning plan.

The new zoning plan for the airport – owned by the city of Dayton – was adopted by the township last year.

RELATED: Airports help fuel jobs, economy: See how yours compares

The new plan permits “corporate and regional development” in the northwest corner of the airport nearest Austin Landing. It also allows those uses in the southwest portion of the airport along Ohio 741 to the county line, township records show.

The changes approved by the township last week specified that one outdoor advertising sign would be permitted and only in “the southern portion,” records show.

“There are really no changes per se to the actual intent of this area,” Miami Twp. Deputy Community Development Director Kyle Hinkelman said. “There are just text changes to make it very, very clear what is intended and where an outdoor advertising sign is permitted.”

RELATED: FAA approves runway expansion plan at Dayton-Wright Brothers’ Airport

The city of Dayton’s advertising policy and the standards of Key-Ads will ensure the digital messages are “consistent with our family values,” Keyes has said.

Other uses permitted in the areas designated for corporate and regional development include:

•Offices.

•Airports and heliports with associated hangars and support facilities.

•Automobile rental and lease.

•Retail, including one automobile gas and service center.

•Restaurants, including fast food where the drive through is not fronting Ohio 741.

-MORE AIRPORT COVERAGE:

RELATED: Not your ‘typical aircraft hangar:’ Business builds $5 million site at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport

RELATED: Runway extension may not require realigning part of Austin Boulevard

RELATED: Report outlines scenarios for business park next to airport

RELATED: Study: Land near airport can capture defense, aviation jobs


DAYTON AD RULES

City of Dayton policies state advertisements shall not contain, promote or include the following:

•Obscene, pornographic or violent material or market tobacco, or illegal or prohibited substances.

•Content that demeans or disparages an individual or groups of individuals.

•Political issues or advocate for or against political candidates, political campaigns, ballot measures, or political parties or organizations.

•Disparaging information on any religion or religious issue.

•Services in direct competition with the Department of Aviation’s business objectives, and shall not contain material that is not in the best business interest of the Department of Aviation or air transportation.

SOURCE: City of Dayton

About the Author