“Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami,” is a showcase for the art of paper folding like you’ve never seen.

LAST CHANCE TO SEE IT: Origami art reaches a whole new level in this Dayton exhibit

Don’t miss the origami exhibit at the Dayton Art Institute 

You’ve never seen paper folded like this before. 

A school of paper koi swim across a vertical pond, seemingly never-ending pages flow from a book, and creatures made from crumpled wrapping paper float just below the ceiling.

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“Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami” is a showcase for the art of paper folding like you’ve never seen. But you’d better hurry -- the exhibit ends on Sunday, May 13, 2018.

"Shine" by artist Yuko Nishimura, is one of the pieces in the Dayton Art Institute origami exhibit, “Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami” . The artist meticulously folds single white sheets of Japanese handmade paper into conceptual reliefs. LISA POWELL / STAFF

The exhibit, which opened in February, closes Friday at the Dayton Art Institute. Here are five things to know about the artwork and the artists.

1. Dimensional art. Origami literally means “paper folding.” Origami is the only art form that starts in two dimensions — a flat sheet of paper — and ends in three dimensions. According to the DAI , “artists are making complex sculptural works and scientists and mathematicians are using origami to unlock the mysteries of the universe.” 

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2. Early ritual. The art evolved from Shinto purification rituals and gift exchanges among Japanese nobility 1,000 years ago. By the 18th century, origami became popular among the general population. The first known origami instruction book was published in 1797. 

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3. International master folders. The exhibit features the work of nine master folders who hail from seven countries: United States, Canada, France, Israel, China, Japan and the United Kingdom. 

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4. Youthful accomplishments. Artist Erik Demaine achieved his PhD by the age of 20. He completed a dissertation on computational origami and has been on the faculty of MIT since 2001. 

"Ruga Swan," by artist Jiangmei Wu, is one of the pieces in the Dayton Art Institute origami exhibit, “Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami” . LISA POWELL / STAFF

5. Art as science. Robert Lang’s origami has been featured in a TED talk, a Mitsubishi car commercial and in a Google Doodle. He gave up his career as a laser physicist to focus on the art and science of origami.

Want to go to the special exhibition?

WHAT: “Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami” Exhibition

WHEN: Feb. 17-May 13, 2018

HOURS: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday; 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday

WHERE: Dayton Art Institute, 456 Belmonte Park North, Dayton

COST: $14/adult; $11/seniors (60+), active military and groups; $11 for college students (18+ with ID), $6 for youth and children (17 and under). Free for children 6 and under and for DAI members.

INFO: daytonartinstitute.org

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