Meet the two Medal of Honor recipients still living in Ohio

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 29:  The Medal of Honor that will be awarded to Navy Senior Chief Edward Byers Jr., is displayed during the ceremony in the East Room of the White House February 29, 2016 in Washington, DC. A member of Navy SEAL Team 6, Byers received the Medal of Honor for his role in rescuing an American hostage from the Taliban in Afghanistan in December 2012.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 29: The Medal of Honor that will be awarded to Navy Senior Chief Edward Byers Jr., is displayed during the ceremony in the East Room of the White House February 29, 2016 in Washington, DC. A member of Navy SEAL Team 6, Byers received the Medal of Honor for his role in rescuing an American hostage from the Taliban in Afghanistan in December 2012. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

It was designated by the United States Congress that March 25 of each year would be known as National Medal of Honor Day. This day is dedicated to the remembrance of Medal of Honor recipients.

The Medal of Honor is the nation’s highest military honor. Since its creation in 1861, there have been 3,469 Medals of Honor awarded.

» RELATED: A tale of 3 local heroes

Seven Medal of Honor recipients from or accredited to Ohio are still living. Two recipients, Frank Herda and Ronald Rosser, still call Ohio home.

Frank Herda

Herda was issued his Medal of Honor on May 13, 1970 for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Herda served as a Private First Class in the United States Army with the 506th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division during the Vietnam War.

» MORE COVERAGE: Ohio's Medal of Honor recipients

Herda was stationed with Company A, 1st Battalion in Vietnam when, on June 29, 1968, a large enemy force initiated an attack. Herda protected two of his comrades from a grenade blast by using his body to cover the grenade. He received grievous wounds. Herda, 70, is currently living in Cleveland and is the author of The Chronicles of The Dragon of the Magi series.

Ronald Rosser

Ronald Rosser was issued his Medal of Honor on June 27, 1952 for conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty. Rosser served as a Corporal in the Heavy Mortar Company for the United States Army during the Korean War.

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CHICAGO - SEPTEMBER 15: Congressional Medal of Honor recipients Ronald Rosser (R) and Bernard Fisher (L) are pushed out for the start of the opening ceremony for the Medal of Honor Society Convention at Soldier Field September 15, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The Medal of Honor is the highest military honor awarded for bravery on the battlefield. There are currently 95 living Medal of Honor Recipients. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Credit: Scott Olson

CHICAGO - SEPTEMBER 15:  Congressional Medal of Honor recipients Ronald Rosser (R) and Bernard Fisher (L) are pushed out for the start of the opening ceremony for the Medal of Honor Society Convention at Soldier Field September 15, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The Medal of Honor is the highest military honor awarded for bravery on the battlefield. There are currently 95 living Medal of Honor Recipients.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Credit: Scott Olson

Combined ShapeCaption
CHICAGO - SEPTEMBER 15: Congressional Medal of Honor recipients Ronald Rosser (R) and Bernard Fisher (L) are pushed out for the start of the opening ceremony for the Medal of Honor Society Convention at Soldier Field September 15, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The Medal of Honor is the highest military honor awarded for bravery on the battlefield. There are currently 95 living Medal of Honor Recipients. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Credit: Scott Olson

Credit: Scott Olson

On Jan. 12 1952, Rosser was a forward observer with the lead platoon of Company L, 38th Infantry Regiment, as they were assaulting heavily fortified enemy hill positions. When the company came under fire from two directions, Rosser gave his assistant his radio and charged the enemy positions with only a carbine and a grenade.

Rosser charged the enemy’s bunkers three times, each time exhausting his ammunition before retreating to gather more. When the platoon retreated, Rosser made several trips across open terrain under enemy fire to help rescue men more injured then he was. Rosser, 88, currently lives in Roseville, Ohio.

The five other living Medal of Honor recipients from Ohio:

Name Conflict Branch Residence Year Awarded
Edward Byers Jr. Afghanistan Navy N/A 2016
Sammy Davis Vietnam Army Indiana 1968
Arthur Jackson World War II Marine Corps Idaho 1945
Gordon Roberts Vietnam Army North Carolina 1971
Brian Thacker Vietnam Army Maryland 1973

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