Stop the 'Medi-scare' politics, Paul Ryan tells Democrats

One big item on the Congress’ agenda for the lame-duck session that begins Monday is passage of a new spending bill because the current one expires Dec. 9. A spokeswoman for House Speaker Paul Ryan said that the Wisconsin Republican told his GOP colleagues that “in consultation with the incoming Trump administration, it was determined that a (funding stopgap) into March is the best approach.”
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One big item on the Congress’ agenda for the lame-duck session that begins Monday is passage of a new spending bill because the current one expires Dec. 9. A spokeswoman for House Speaker Paul Ryan said that the Wisconsin Republican told his GOP colleagues that “in consultation with the incoming Trump administration, it was determined that a (funding stopgap) into March is the best approach.”

Medicare needs to be revamped, House Speaker Paul Ryan emphasized Thursday, as he blasted Democrats for insisting Republicans are planning a war on seniors.

"I think what's happening is you're getting the latest wave of Democratic talking points to try and play Medi-scare politics, which is what they typically do every other Tuesday," the Wisconsin Republican said.

Ryan, speaking at his weekly news conference, responded to Democratic warnings earlier this week that Republicans are eager to privatize the government-run health care program for the elderly and some others. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., who will lead Senate Democrats next year, said the GOP was "plotting a war on seniors next year."

Ryan has been a longtime advocate of changes to Medicare, which is expected to exhaust its reserves by 2028.Among his ideas: "You get to choose among plans that are comprehensive and guaranteed to meet your benefits. Or if you want to stick with the current traditional program, you can do that as well."

Ryan said he has not talked about Medicare with President-elect Donald Trump.Ryan warned: "We are going to have to do things to preserve and shore-up this program. The reforms that we've been talking about here in the House Republicans for many years are reforms that do not affect the benefits for anyone in or near retirement."

But for younger people, "it won't be there for us if we stay on the current path."

As a result, Ryan said, "We have to do things to fix this program so we can guarantee that it's there intact for current seniors, but also that there's something there for us when we retire."