Tech company plans to move within Dayton, create new jobs

601 and 607 E. Third St. CORY FROLIK/STAFF

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601 and 607 E. Third St. CORY FROLIK/STAFF

Dayton company Battle Sight Technologies wants to relocate and add jobs with funding support from the city and the ED/GE program.

On Wednesday, Dayton city commissioners will decide whether to approve a development agreement with the company to help it move from Tech Town into new offices at 601 E. Third St.

Under the proposed agreement, the city would provide $80,000 in Montgomery County Economic Development/Government Equity funds and $20,000 from its development fund.

Battle Sight has agreed to create about 25 new jobs and retain five existing jobs over the next five years. The company sells writing devices for low-light environments for the military and first-responders.

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Here's an early sneak peek at construction progress of The Manhattan, also known as the J.K. McIntire Building, built in 1912 and located at 601 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton's historic Webster Station neighborhood. From 1946 to 1948, the building's upper three floors were leased by the Monsanto Company for use as a laboratory to test the biological impact of polonium radiation on Dayton Project personnel, part of the larger U.S. military led Manhattan Project, which resulted in the creation of the first atomic bomb during World War Two. Polonium is a radioactive element used to trigger atomic weapons and was produced as part of the Dayton Project. The building's name change in September 2019 is a tribute to Dayton's role in the Manhattan Project. This property is being redeveloped by Dayton based Woodard Development. The future anchor tenants of the building will be Dayton technology companies Mile Two and Battle Sight Technologies. Also featured in this gallery are some impressive views of downtown Dayton via the building's rooftop. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Here's an early sneak peek at construction progress of The Manhattan, also known as the J.K. McIntire Building, built in 1912 and located at 601 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton's historic Webster Station neighborhood. From 1946 to 1948, the building's upper three floors were leased by the Monsanto Company for use as a laboratory to test the biological impact of polonium radiation on Dayton Project personnel, part of the larger U.S. military led Manhattan Project, which resulted in the creation of the first atomic bomb during World War Two. Polonium is a radioactive element used to trigger atomic weapons and was produced as part of the Dayton Project. The building's name change in September 2019 is a tribute to Dayton's role in the Manhattan Project. This property is being redeveloped by Dayton based Woodard Development. The future anchor tenants of the building will be Dayton technology companies Mile Two and Battle Sight Technologies. Also featured in this gallery are some impressive views of downtown Dayton via the building's rooftop. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Combined ShapeCaption
Here's an early sneak peek at construction progress of The Manhattan, also known as the J.K. McIntire Building, built in 1912 and located at 601 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton's historic Webster Station neighborhood. From 1946 to 1948, the building's upper three floors were leased by the Monsanto Company for use as a laboratory to test the biological impact of polonium radiation on Dayton Project personnel, part of the larger U.S. military led Manhattan Project, which resulted in the creation of the first atomic bomb during World War Two. Polonium is a radioactive element used to trigger atomic weapons and was produced as part of the Dayton Project. The building's name change in September 2019 is a tribute to Dayton's role in the Manhattan Project. This property is being redeveloped by Dayton based Woodard Development. The future anchor tenants of the building will be Dayton technology companies Mile Two and Battle Sight Technologies. Also featured in this gallery are some impressive views of downtown Dayton via the building's rooftop. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Credit: Tom Gilliam

The company plans to invest about $900,000 into its new home, including for improvements and renovations, equipment and furnishings, according to city documents.

The project will support the expansion of an essential business during the current emergency, wrote economic development director Ford Weber in a memo to the city manager.

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