UD to resume some in-person classes Wednesday; campus alert level lowered

Bree Nurray, a University of Dayton senior from Pittsburgh, takes an online class on the front porch of her rental house on the campus Wednesday August 26, 2020.
Bree Nurray, a University of Dayton senior from Pittsburgh, takes an online class on the front porch of her rental house on the campus Wednesday August 26, 2020.

Credit: JIM NOELKER

Credit: JIM NOELKER

The University of Dayton announced today it has downgraded the campus alert level to Yellow, and will begin in-person classes for some courses next week.

Officials there are pleased that the 7-day average of new cases, the positivity rate of randomly tested students and the number of active coronavirus cases on campus have continued to decline, according to the Eric Spina, the university’s president.

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“We have had very good meetings the past two days with our medical panel and with Health Commissioner Jeff Cooper and his team, and they agree that these trends allow us to lower the campus status to ‘caution’ and move some classes to in-person learning starting on Wednesday,” Spina said this morning during an online press conference.

In-person classes have been carefully designed to allow for physical distancing, Spina said. Face coverings are required and students and staff have been trained in safety measures, including cleaning and disinfecting between classes, he said.

“We hope to be able to open up more courses to in-person learning the week of Sept. 21 if current trends continue,” Spina said. “This remains a critical time. Our students — and our entire Flyer community — cannot let up in efforts to limit the spread of the coronavirus. We must continue to wear face coverings, keep physical distance, and follow other safety protocols.”

University leaders will continue to evaluate the COVID-19 case trends, and expect to announce next week if additional classes will move to in-person instruction.

Enhanced safety measures remain in effect, including no in-person dining and no visitors.

Spina said safety remains the university’s top priority for campus and the greater Dayton community.

“We’re asking students to remain on campus to protect against spreading the virus in the community," he said. “We also continue to focus on testing students for COVID, including hundreds of students a week as part of our surveillance testing program; isolating confirmed cases; and moving their close contacts into quarantine.”

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