Mayor Whaley promotes ACA sign-ups

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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The final deadline for enrollment in private health plans under the ACA is Jan. 31, and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley on Tuesday encouraged everyone eligible to sign up.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley on Tuesday encouraged eligible Dayton-area residents to sign up for private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) before the final deadline for enrollment on Jan. 31.

Consumers have until Jan. 15 to sign up for coverage that starts Feb. 1, and, so far, more than 230,000 Ohioans have re-enrolled or signed up for first time for commercial health plans sold through the Health Insurance Marketplace created by the ACA.

Nationwide, more than 11.5 million people were signed up for marketplace coverage as of Dec. 24 — an increase of 286,000 compared to the same period a year ago, according to a press release Tuesday from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley on Tuesday encouraged eligible Dayton-area residents to sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act before the final deadline for enrollment on Jan. 31. CORNELIUS FROLIK / Staff

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley on Tuesday encouraged eligible Dayton-area residents to sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act before the final deadline for enrollment on Jan. 31. CORNELIUS FROLIK / Staff

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Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley on Tuesday encouraged eligible Dayton-area residents to sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act before the final deadline for enrollment on Jan. 31. CORNELIUS FROLIK / Staff

During a conference call with reporters, Whaley said access to health insurance under the ACA, commonly known as Obamacare, has helped the local community stay healthy and productive, and she pledged to support the health law to “make sure that our communities and our families have options for health care.”

The law has come under fire from President-elect Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans who have promised to repeal and replace the law, which they believe is too costly and inefficient.

Last Tuesday, Republican Senate leaders introduced a bill that would use budget reconciliation to freeze funding and undo key elements of the law, but they have yet to introduce replacement legislation.

HHS Regional Director Kathleen Falk said repealing the law without an immediate replacement would jeopardize health coverage for more than 20 million Americans who have helped drive down the share of medically uninsured to its lowest level in the nation’s history.

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