Menorah lighting, donuts, latkes part of free, public Hanukkah celebration tonight

The Chabad of Greater Dayton will hold a public lighting of  the menorah erected at The Greene 6 p.m. tonight, Dec. 29.
Caption
The Chabad of Greater Dayton will hold a public lighting of the menorah erected at The Greene 6 p.m. tonight, Dec. 29.

Credit: The Chabad of Greater Dayton

Credit: The Chabad of Greater Dayton

The sixth night of Chanukah (or as commonly spelled, Hanukkah) will be celebrated at The Greene with singing, dancing and a whole bunch of homemade donuts and latkes(potato pancakes).

The Chabad of Greater Dayton will light the menorah at The Greene,  4450 Buckeye Lane in Beavercreek, during a free public ceremony 6 p.m. tonight, Dec. 29.

The celebration will take place in the Plum Street Park between White House Black Market and Pasha’s Grill.

>>MORE: Move over hashbrowns, latkes are where it’s at for Hanukkah

Rabbi Levi Simon said it is the Dayton area only large scale public lightening ceremony for Chanukah, the eight-night Jewish festival of lights.

A candle will be lit each night through Sunday, Jan. 1, the last day of Chanukah.

The Chabad of Greater Dayton will hold a public lighting of  the menorah erected at The Greene 6 p.m. tonight, Dec. 29.
Caption
The Chabad of Greater Dayton will hold a public lighting of the menorah erected at The Greene 6 p.m. tonight, Dec. 29.

Credit: The Chabad of Greater Dayton

Credit: The Chabad of Greater Dayton

“The Menorah serves as a symbol of the dedication to preserve and encourage the freedom to worship (God) openly, and with pride,” said Simon, the events organizer. “Specifically in America, a nation that was founded upon and vigorously protects the right of every person to practice his or her religion free from restraint and persecution, the Menorah takes on profound significance, embodying both religious and constitutional principles.”

The Hebrew word for “dedication” is “Chanukah.”

It recognizes the rededication of the  Second Temple in Jerusalem more than 2,100 years ago.

Jewish people rose up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors during the Maccabean Revolt.