Store Front by Robert J. Smith. A mother and child are the focus of this painting that captures a scene at Rike’s Department Store in Dayton. The painting, created in 1933, offers “an idealized vision of her dual role in modern society as both a devout consumer and a dutiful mother,” according to Dayton Art Institute research. LISA POWELL / STAFF
Photo: Staff Writer
Photo: Staff Writer

Picture perfect: Celebrate moms in works of art at the Dayton Art Institute 

Looking for an artistic way to spend Mother’s Day? A stroll through the galleries of the Dayton Art Institute will surround you with maternal love.

Jerry Smith, chief curator for the Dayton Art Institute, highlighted art works on display with mothers at the heart of them.

“Say what you will about artists, but most of them had mothers, so they like depicting mothers,” Smith said. “It’s an important story of life and of being. It’s a story we can relate to.”

Here are 6 art works featuring mothers on display at the DAI:

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Our Lady Of The Fields No. 4 by George Rouault. The French artist uses abstraction to tell the classical story of The Madonna and Christ Child said Smith who described the painting as “a tender moment with a human story being told.” LISA POWELL / STAFF
Photo: Staff Writer

“Our Lady Of The Fields No. 4” by George Rouault

The French artist uses abstraction to tell the classical story of The Madonna and Christ Child said Smith, who described the painting as “a tender moment with a human story being told.”

A sense of color creates the halos around their heads and “an almost big singular brush stroke,” creates their limbs in an embrace.

This is “a beautiful modernist design that is tender,” said Smith. The style is “not necessarily the way people think of religious paintings, which makes it both challenging and rewarding.”

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The sculpture, Mother Cradling Baby by Hugo Robus, is made of plaster and created in 1957. The simplified forms of mother and child suggests if was influenced by modernist art movements according to the object label and “the rhythmic, fluid forms of the figures amplify the tenderness of their embrace…” LISA POWELL / STAFF
Photo: Staff Writer

“Mother Cradling Baby” by Hugo Robus

This sculpture made of plaster in 1957 is a simplified form of mother and child that suggests it was influenced by modernist art movements, according to DAI research.

Smith describes the child as flexing and pushing into a mother who is “so solid and firm” with her embrace. The mother’s expression is filled with “such tenderness in her face as she looks at her baby.”

Store Front by Robert J. Smith. A mother and child are the focus of this painting that captures a scene at Rike’s Department Store in Dayton. The painting, created in 1933, offers “an idealized vision of her dual role in modern society as both a devout consumer and a dutiful mother,” according to Dayton Art Institute research. LISA POWELL / STAFF
Photo: Staff Writer

“Store Front” by Robert J. Smith

A watchful eye and the protective hand of a mother reach out to steady her child as they are caught in a rush on a busy Dayton street.

This painting, which captures a scene at Rike’s Department Store, is “a terrific slice of life,” said Smith.

Painted in 1933, the scene captures a congested doorway at the downtown store as shoppers enter and exit. Though the artist painted a sturdy little girl in a pink dress and hat, Smith also describes her as “dainty and fabulous.”

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The Fugitive’s Story by John Rogers. An escaped slave holds her child in her arms as she recounts her accounts to three leaders of the anti-slavery movement. LISA POWELL / STAFF
Photo: Staff Writer

“The Fugitive’s Story” by John Rogers

A runaway slave, holding her sleeping child in her arms, describes how she escaped to three prominent abolitionists.

The mother’s “truly life and death story,” is recounted to John Greenleaf Whittier, a poet, Brooklyn clergyman Henry Ward Beecher, brother to Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Lloyd Garrison, the editor of the Boston abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator.

Portrait of Mrs. Henry Ainslie With Her Son Henry by George Romney. This intimate portrait of a mother with her child was painted in 1787 when societal attitudes towards children shifted to viewing childhood as a special phase of human existance that placed them at the center of the family’s existance according to Dayton Art Institute research. LISA POWELL / STAFF
Photo: Staff Writer

“Portrait of Mrs. Henry Ainslie With Her Son Henry” by George Romney

This intimate portrait of a mother with her child was painted in 1787 as societal attitudes toward children shifted to viewing childhood as a special phase of human existence that placed them at the center of the family’s existence, according to Dayton Art Institute research.

“I see caring and nurturing and a woman very comfortable in her role as the mother of Henry Ainslie,” said Smith.

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Madonna and Child by Luca Cambiaso. The image of the Virgin Mary with her son, the Christ Child, is the most common in all of Christian Art according to the Dayton Art Institute. “…paintings such as this one emphasized the warmth and tenderness between the Virgin Mary and her son.” LISA POWELL / STAFF
Photo: Staff Writer

“Madonna And Child” by Luca Cambiaso

The image of the Virgin Mary with her son, the Christ Child, is the most common in all of Christian art, according to the DAI. In this painting Mary and a chubby Christ Child are captured in an intimate moment full of feeling.

“Paintings such as this one emphasized the warmth and tenderness between the Virgin Mary and her son,” said Smith.

Children may be depicted in different styles within each of the art works but “the caring and warmth of the mothers is consistent,” said Smith.

“What you find in every single one of these images is the warmth of the mother is there.”

WHILE VISITING THE MUSEUM

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