Community Gem: Becky Dill of Brookville sews over 14K masks, gives them away for free

Over the course of the pandemic, Becky Dill, 64, of Brookville has sewn and given away over 14,000 face masks, including holiday-themed masks. Submitted photo.
Caption
Over the course of the pandemic, Becky Dill, 64, of Brookville has sewn and given away over 14,000 face masks, including holiday-themed masks. Submitted photo.

BROOKVILLE — A retired school teacher, Becky Dill, 64, estimates she’s sewn more than 14,000 masks over the course of the pandemic and given most of them away to schools, nursing homes, hospitals and anybody who wants to pick them up.

Christine Yeary noticed the frequent posts in a Brookville Facebook group by Dill’s husband, David Dill, letting people know there were free masks available. He posts things like, “Becky has been busy making masks. Tubs are full again. FREE 720 Albert Road.”

Yeary nominated Brookville residents Becky and David Dill as Dayton Daily News Community Gems.

“I just felt that they deserved it for giving of their time and their money and resources to help others, and not even to charge a fee for what they’re doing,” she said.

But David Dill says all the credit should go to his wife.

“People would say, ‘oh, you guys are such a blessing, thank you for what you do,’” he said. “And I always say, ‘thank you for the kind words but Becky’s the one who makes them, I’m just the front man.’”

Becky Dill — who was named Brookville citizen of the month in February by the city — doesn’t like the spotlight.

“I really don’t care for all the publicity. I don’t make masks for recognition. I make them because I care about everyone,” she said.

Becky Dill started making masks at the beginning of the pandemic and selling them for a few dollars.

“And then early on, one day she goes, ‘I’m just gonna give them away. That’s what I feel I need to do,’” David Dill said.

During the height of the pandemic, Becky Dill spent much of her day making masks. The Dills got donations of fabric and other materials from the community but made most of them with their own money.

David Dill said his wife is a community gem because, “she’s willing to do so much for everybody else.”

About the Author

ajc.com