Dayton buys former Parkside Homes property for recreation expansion

Kettering Field park complex. Dayton just purchased some land that it wants to use to expand recreational activities. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

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Kettering Field park complex. Dayton just purchased some land that it wants to use to expand recreational activities. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

Dayton has approved purchasing the former Parkside Homes public housing property in support of plans to expand the recreational space near Kettering Field.

“The riverfront master plan called it out for basically a way to bring on more fields, more outdoor recreational space,” said Dayton City Manager Shelley Dickstein.

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An overhead view of ballfields at the Kettering Field site north of downtown Dayton. STAFF FILE PHOTO

An overhead view of ballfields at the Kettering Field site north of downtown Dayton. STAFF FILE PHOTO

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An overhead view of ballfields at the Kettering Field site north of downtown Dayton. STAFF FILE PHOTO

Parkside Homes, a collection of dozens of subsidized apartment buildings, was constructed in 1941 but demolished more than a decade ago.

The site essentially is bound by Interstate 75, Helena Street, Keowee Street and the Kettering Field complex.

Greater Dayton Premier Management, the local public housing authority, has agreed to sell 59 acres of the former apartment site to the city for $345,000.

The new property is mostly vacant, except for some city-operated ballfields and a recently built artificial turf field, said Todd Kinskey, Dayton’s director of planning, neighborhoods and development,

Almost two years ago, the NFL built the turf field to honor the first-ever professional football game, which was played in Dayton in 1920.

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NFL finds new site for turf field in Dayton

NFL finds new site for turf field in Dayton

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NFL finds new site for turf field in Dayton

The city is purchasing the property for current and future recreational uses, Kinskey said, and the department of recreation is developing plans for how to best use the vacant land to expand and enhance outdoor sports and recreational activities for the entire community.

The Dayton Riverfront Plan calls for Kettering Field to become an “adventure hub” that connects to the riverfront.

North Bend Boulevard, which runs along the western edge of Kettering Field, is expected to be closed down to create a new promenade, linking to the Deeds Point area.

A new school is being built right by Deeds Point MetroPark, and the developer wants to create a new 2.5-acre public park.

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