Dayton company unique in winning multiple ‘flying car’ awards

Provided by Infinity Labs, this is an image of an Agility Prime concept vehicle.

Combined ShapeCaption
Provided by Infinity Labs, this is an image of an Agility Prime concept vehicle.

Infinity Labs celebrates continued success in ‘Agility Prime’

The leaders of research services company Infinity Labs believe they are the only company to have won two Phase II Agility Prime contracts.

Agility Prime is the Air Force’s development of electric vertical takeoff and landing, or “eVTOL,” aircraft, sometimes called advanced air mobility aircraft or simply “flying cars.”

Jason Molnar, the company’s chief strategy officer, said he is not aware of any other companies who received three “Phase I” awards in the Agility Prime project, as his business has.

ExploreThe first Phase II award: Dayton-area company wins Phase II award in Agility Prime ‘eVTOL’ work

“For Phase II, we know of a few companies and university partners who’ve won an award but not two awards. As of today, I only know of one company, Infinity Labs, who’s been fortunate enough to win two separate awards,” Molnar added.

Last week, the company announced its first Phase II award, to explore first urban air applications with satellite communications hardware and networks.

So do these double Phase II awards put Infinity Labs in rarified air?

“We both believe so and have been told so by friends in the industry which is humbling and exciting but it’s certainly not something we take for granted,” Molnar said.

This latest contract award is focused on analysis of emerging “Urban Air Mobility” (UAM) battery technologies, and the Dayton company’s effort establishes an open-source modeling, simulation, and analysis toolset for use in the design and analysis of UAM aircraft batteries and electrical systems.

The business will also provide insight into the potential of reuse/recyclability of batteries for second-life applications.

Contract terms are $750,000 over a 15 month period.

Said Molnar: “Both efforts considered, these awards support the hiring of up to six full time employees.”

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