Dayton launches new campaign to promote neighborhoods

Kids play on statues at RiverScape in downtown Dayton in 2019. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
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Kids play on statues at RiverScape in downtown Dayton in 2019. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The city of Dayton has launched a new website and ad campaign to try to boost civic engagement and interest in local neighborhoods.

LiveinDayton.org features neighborhood profiles of the city’s 65 planning districts, which have basic information about bikeability, walkability and transit scores, as well as average home and lot sizes.

“We definitely want people to use this as a resource to learn more about the neighborhoods in an unbiased kind of view,” said Steven Gondol, Dayton’s deputy director of planning, neighborhoods and development.

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The 4th Annual Dayton Porchfest returned to the St. Anne’s Hill Historic District on Saturday, August 21, 2021 after having been rescheduled twice from 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The free family-friendly neighborhood music festival, presented by The Collaboratory featured close to 50 musical acts. Since all the musicians donated their time, tip jars were placed at every porch. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Contributed

The 4th Annual Dayton Porchfest returned to the St. Anne’s Hill Historic District on Saturday, August 21, 2021 after having been rescheduled twice from 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The free family-friendly neighborhood music festival, presented by The Collaboratory featured close to 50 musical acts. Since all the musicians donated their time, tip jars were placed at every porch. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER
Caption
The 4th Annual Dayton Porchfest returned to the St. Anne’s Hill Historic District on Saturday, August 21, 2021 after having been rescheduled twice from 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The free family-friendly neighborhood music festival, presented by The Collaboratory featured close to 50 musical acts. Since all the musicians donated their time, tip jars were placed at every porch. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Contributed

Credit: Contributed

ExploreWhat’s life like in Dayton? Project offers answers to draw residents

The site also has links to connect visitors to city services, utility and other service providers and incentive programs that are available for residents.

“It’s really a great site,” said Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley. “Scrolling through it, it’s really easy to use on your phone.”

The city also is kicking off a “Know Your Neighborhood” ad campaign that encourages residents to get involved in their communities.

The National League of Cities gave Dayton a $17,000 grant to help with the campaign to increase civic engagement, especially among underrepresented groups, said Jordan Lewis, legislative aide with the Dayton City Commission Office.

“It’s an additional tool for recruitment for neighborhood presidents and neighborhood associations,” he said. “The emphasis here is on interpersonal connections, projects in your neighborhood and amenities that your neighborhood has to offer.”

The city also purchased 30,000 “palm cards” in eight languages that will be distributed with customizable information, possibly such as the dates, times and locations of neighborhood association meetings or their contact info.

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The Dayton Art Institute’s 50th Oktoberfest returned to the museum’s grounds in the Grafton Hill neighborhood from Saturday, Sept. 25 through Sunday, Sept. 26, 2021. Last year’s festival was held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Did we spot you there on Saturday? TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Tom Gilliam

The Dayton Art Institute’s 50th Oktoberfest returned to the museum’s grounds in the Grafton Hill neighborhood from Saturday, Sept. 25 through Sunday, Sept. 26, 2021. Last year’s festival was held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Did we spot you there on Saturday? TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER
Caption
The Dayton Art Institute’s 50th Oktoberfest returned to the museum’s grounds in the Grafton Hill neighborhood from Saturday, Sept. 25 through Sunday, Sept. 26, 2021. Last year’s festival was held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Did we spot you there on Saturday? TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Credit: Tom Gilliam

The city plans to put up about 100 yard signs, two dozen banners at its recreation centers and billboards at four locations across the city as part of the Know Your Neighborhood initiative. A new social media campaign is expected to launch in the next few weeks too.

“This is a just a great kind of way that our city staff is thinking outside the box, about how we can connect better with our neighborhoods and our neighbors,” said Dayton City Commissioner Chris Shaw.

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