Dayton moves to fire employee for alleged mask violations, unauthorized absence

During much of the pandemic, the city of Dayton required people who entered city-owned buildings to wear a mask because of COVID-19. JIM NOELKER/STAFF

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During much of the pandemic, the city of Dayton required people who entered city-owned buildings to wear a mask because of COVID-19. JIM NOELKER/STAFF

The city of Dayton has discharged an employee who last year allegedly did not wear a mask as required, failed to wear a mask properly and was absent without leave, according to disciplinary records in his personnel file.

In late August, Kyle Seaquist, a construction electrician with the city’s aviation division, allegedly failed to comply with a direct order from human resources Director Ken Couch to obtain a mask from HR and wear it in City Hall, violating the city’s mask policies, according to disciplinary records.

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Dayton City Hall. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Credit: Ty Greenlees

Dayton City Hall. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Credit: Ty Greenlees

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Dayton City Hall. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Credit: Ty Greenlees

Credit: Ty Greenlees

Dayton’s mask policy, which was lifted a few months ago, required city employees to properly wear a mask at all times when in city facilities, except when they were alone in an office, HR said.

Seaquist also was accused of failing to follow a direct order by HR division manager Dawn Manuel to adjust his face mask to properly cover his nose and mouth.

During an administrative hearing, Seaquist was found guilty of these violations and also of being absent without leave.

Seaquist pleaded not guilty to the civil service charges, and the Civil Service Board held a hearing in May to consider his dismissal.

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A sanitation worker cleans the front desk area at Dayton City Hall. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

A sanitation worker cleans the front desk area at Dayton City Hall. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

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A sanitation worker cleans the front desk area at Dayton City Hall. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The board is expected to issue a ruling by mid-July, city officials said.

Seaquist, who has been employed by the city since 2016, also previously worked in the water and sewer department.

Dayton’s HR department said it is not aware of any other city employee being disciplined for mask and COVID-related safety violations.

Seaquist’s attorney did not immediately return requests for comment.

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