Englewood approves fire levy; Clayton elects incumbents

The City of Englewood asked residents to pass a fire and EMS levy in the November election.  MARSHALL GORBY\STAFF
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The City of Englewood asked residents to pass a fire and EMS levy in the November election. MARSHALL GORBY\STAFF

Residents in Englewood passed a new fire and EMS levy by a large margin Tuesday, according to unofficial results from the Montgomery County Board of Elections.

More than 72% of voters cast a yes ballot for the property tax levy that will cost an extra $57 annually for an owner of a $100,000 home.

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The money generated from the Englewood Fire and EMS Levy will go to upgrading equipment like radios and extraction tools, as well as addressing the city’s aging fleet.

Meanwhile, the unofficial results show that Englewood residents voted to keep two incumbent council members and gave one seat to a new person.

Adrienne Draper led the way with 29% of the vote and Andrew Gough got 25%. Political newcomer Darren Sawmiller scored 23% of the vote and slightly edged out Solomon Hill who got 22% of the vote.

As with all races, results will not be final until provisional ballots and late-arriving absentee ballots are addressed, according to county election officials.

Clayton incumbents sweep

There will be no change in Clayton when it comes to elected leaders.

Residents gave Mayor Mike Stevens a new term at the city’s helm, according to unofficial results from the Montgomery County Board of Elections. Stevens took home 62% of the vote over challenger Warren Wysong, who garnered 38%.

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Stevens told the Dayton Daily News during the campaign that he wants to improve the city’s infrastructure and bring the community together.

Residents opted to keep their three incumbent council members as well. Tina Kelly led the way with 33% of the vote, Greg Merkle got 27% and Brendan Bachman scored 24% of the vote. Political newcomer Jeremy Blanford fell short with 16% of the vote.

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