Families speak at downtown rally demanding justice for police killings of Black people

Families and supporters of people killed by police violence march in Courthouse Square on Saturday, The banner is a list of names of Black people killed by police. March 3. EILEEN McCLORY STAFF
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Families and supporters of people killed by police violence march in Courthouse Square on Saturday, The banner is a list of names of Black people killed by police. March 3. EILEEN McCLORY STAFF

About 100 people rallied at Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton Saturday afternoon to show support for Black people who have been killed by police.

Organizers of Ohio Families Unite Against Police Brutality said the rally was the next step in a series of family-first events in Ohio aimed at reopening cases of police brutality that were previously thrown out.

Sabrina Jordan, whose son Jamarco McShann was killed by police in Moraine in 2017, said she appreciated the support of those who attend, but added more was needed across Ohio.

“Here in Ohio, you need to start representing Ohio,” said Jordan, the founder of Ohio Families Unite Against Police Brutality.

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Families from Dayton, Columbus and Cleveland who have lost a loved one during a police shooting marched briefly in the plaza and spoke out about their experiences with police violence.

Those at the march were also asked to consider supporting a potential Ohio constitutional amendment, “Civil Action for Deprivation of Constitutional Rights Amendment,” which community organizer Cynthia Brown with the Heartbeat Movement said would better hold police accountable.

Organizers are collecting signatures to put the initiative on a future election ballot, Brown said.

Karla Carey, also with Ohio Families Unite Against Police Brutality, said some of the Dayton families who have lost loved ones are not getting the publicity that Cleveland and Columbus families are getting.

“Let me tell you, being in this fight with these families isn’t easy,” she said “It’s an emotional roller coaster, and they will tell you that every time another shooting occurs, that band aid is pulled off their wounds.”

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Dion Green, a local activist whose father, Derrick Fudge, was killed in the Oregon District shooting in 2019, attended the event. Green watched as Fudge died in his arms following the shooting. Green said he supports and stands by families who have lost loved ones to police violence.

“We all lost a loved one,” he said. “It’s emotionally draining, and we have to stand together and fight.”