Live in Huber Heights? Here’s how to give feedback on proposed shopping, civic district

Demolition continues on the Marian shopping center Tuesday, April 27, 2021. The lot is the future home of the Huber Heights branch library. MARSHALL GORBY\STAFF
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Demolition continues on the Marian shopping center Tuesday, April 27, 2021. The lot is the future home of the Huber Heights branch library. MARSHALL GORBY\STAFF

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HUBER HEIGHTS — City residents can give feed back Tuesday to Huber Heights City Council on proposed plans for a new shopping and civic district replacing the Marian Shopping Center at the corner of Brandt Pike and Fishburg Road.

“Everybody is going to have some different ideas about what they would like to see,” said Mayor Jeff Gore.

A map of the Southpointe Crossing, which is the shopping center on Brandt Pike that the city of Huber Heights is redeveloping. Courtesy of Huber Heights.
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A map of the Southpointe Crossing, which is the shopping center on Brandt Pike that the city of Huber Heights is redeveloping. Courtesy of Huber Heights.

Huber Heights bought part of the Marian Shopping Center on Brandt Pike for about $3 million at the beginning of 2020. The city bought land adjacent to the shopping center from Premier Health for $520,000. The Premier Health land is about 17 acres.

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A rendering of the Southpointe Crossing, which is the shopping center on Brandt Pike that the city of Huber Heights is redeveloping. Courtesy of Huber Heights.
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A rendering of the Southpointe Crossing, which is the shopping center on Brandt Pike that the city of Huber Heights is redeveloping. Courtesy of Huber Heights.

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City documents examined by the Dayton Daily News show renderings for a proposed library, senior apartment buildings, a civic building, an expansion of Premier Health’s existing network in the area, shopping and a commercial district.

The library will be about 27,000 square feet and cost about $12 million to build.

The library will have two entrances, with one off Brandt Pike and a parking lot at the back of the building. Jayne Klose, community engagement manager for the Dayton Metro Library system, said the architects planned it so anyone walking to the library, using the bus or driving there would have the same experience entering the building. It will have public meeting space, according to renderings.

Kloss said the Huber Heights library is one of the busiest in the region.

Glenn Otto, a city councilman running against Gore for mayor, said he is encouraging residents to come to the meeting and give their thoughts on what should go into the center.

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Otto said he was surprised to see how much housing was on the plans as he believed that amount of housing hadn’t been discussed among council members.

“Based on that survey that we spent a year and a lot of money on, residents wanted a place where we could come in and walk and talk and hang out and enjoy an afternoon and spend a few hours,” Otto said. “What’s being presented, it looks like there’s a whole lot of blacktop, a sea of pavement and more homes.”

The meeting is set for 6 p.m. Tuesday in council chambers at 6131 Taylorsville Road in Huber Heights.