Ohio to increase deer disease monitoring in 3 counties

Testing for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Ohio’s white-tailed deer population will continue during the 2021-22 hunting  season, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR)  Division of Wildlife.
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Testing for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Ohio’s white-tailed deer population will continue during the 2021-22 hunting season, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife.

Testing for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Ohio’s white-tailed deer population will continue during the 2021-22 hunting season, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife.  

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer and other similar species, including mule deer, elk, and moose. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans.  

Two CWD-positive wild deer were confirmed during the 2020-21 hunting season in Wyandot County. A disease surveillance area has been established in response to the confirmed cases, and intensive monitoring will continue for at least three years in Wyandot County as well as portions of Hardin and Marion counties.  

Specific regulations apply to hunters who harvest a deer in this location, including mandatory testing on Nov. 6-7, Nov. 13-14, and the seven-day gun season, Nov. 29 – Dec. 5. In-person sampling is available at the Big Island Wildlife Area Headquarters, Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area Headquarters, and the Wyandot County Fairgrounds on those dates. Self-serve kiosks are also available.

A list of kiosk locations and instructions can be found at ohiodnr.gov/cwd.  

In addition to mandatory testing, the following regulations apply within the disease surveillance area:

  • Prohibits the placement of or use of salt, mineral supplement, grain, fruit, vegetables, or other feed to attract or feed deer
  • Prohibits hunting of deer by the aid of salt, mineral supplement, grain, fruit, vegetables, or other feed
  • Prohibits the removal of a complete carcass or high-risk parts from the disease surveillance area, unless the carcass complies with deer carcass regulations or the carcass is delivered to a certified taxidermist or processor within 24 hours of leaving the area. Additional information on carcass regulations and a complete list of certified processors and taxidermists can be found at wildohio.gov.

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