YEAR-LONG INVESTIGATION: Local doctor suspended for sexual misconduct

The state medical board has suspended the license of Dr. Shane Sampson, a family medicine doctor in Greenville, who admitted to having sex with a female patient who was the wife of another patient and not complying with state laws for tracking prescription painkillers.
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The state medical board has suspended the license of Dr. Shane Sampson, a family medicine doctor in Greenville, who admitted to having sex with a female patient who was the wife of another patient and not complying with state laws for tracking prescription painkillers.

The state medical board has voted to suspended the license of Dr. Shane Sampson, a family medicine doctor in Greenville, who admitted to having sex with a female patient who was the wife of another patient and not complying with state laws for tracking prescription painkillers.

Sampson began a sexual relationship with the unidentified patient in July 2013 — just a month after he stopped seeing her husband for treatment — and continued the relationship until the end of the year, according to the details of a consent agreement between Sampson and the State Medical Board of Ohio.

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In addition, Sampson prescribed controlled substances for two separate patients over a period of three years — from December 2011 to December 2014 — without documenting the prescriptions through the Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System, which was created in 2006 to track prescriptions furnished by Ohio prescribers in the wake of the state’s opioid crisis, according to medical board documents.

Sampson, who also has privileges at Wayne HealthCare in Greenville and has a medical license in Indiana, will also be required to provide a written copy of the consent agreement to the chief of staff at each hospital where he has privileges or appointments, and to the state licensing boards in any state where he might apply for a new license.

Sampson, whose office was closed Friday, could not immediately be reached for comment. He can reapply for his license in two years if he meets certain conditions, including the successful completion of a course sanctioned by the medical board dealing with prescribing controlled substances, and a course on physician-patient boundaries.

Sampson’s suspension goes into effect 30 days after the effective date of the consent agreement on Dec. 14. He cannot accept new patients during that 30-day period.

However, Sampson has the right to request a hearing to contest the medical board’s actions, and he may appeal the board’s order to suspend his license in court.

As the Dayton Daily News reported earlier this year in a series of special reports with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, doctors suspended for sexual misconduct are often allowed to return to practice after requesting a court-ordered stay of medical board disciplinary actions, and are usually not required to inform their patients of the sanctions against them.

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A spokeswoman for the medical board said she could not comment on what triggered Sampson’s suspension or the details of the investigation because they are confidential.

The medical board received 75,584 complaints between 1997 and 2015, of which about 1.8 percent involved allegations of sexual misconduct. About 17 percent of the sexual misconduct complaints resulted in disciplinary action, according to the board.

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