Great Miami River rises by several feet in a day after recent rainfall

Geese roam along the Great Miami River with the Dayton skyline in the background. STAFF FILE PHOTO
Geese roam along the Great Miami River with the Dayton skyline in the background. STAFF FILE PHOTO

River level expected to continue to rise between Dayton and Hamilton

The Great Miami River rose about 4 feet between Sunday and Monday morning in Dayton and Hamilton after 1-2 inches of rain fell in the region.

Miami Conservancy District’s dams and levees are working as designed to prevent floodwaters from affecting downtown areas along the river from Piqua to Hamilton, the district reported.

ExploreDams holding back more water in recent decades in southwest Ohio

All five of the district’s dams temporarily stored floodwaters on Sunday. Four of the dams, Lockington, Englewood, Taylorsville and Huffman, were storing water Monday morning.

The dams begin to store floodwaters once the river rises to the top of the conduits at the dams.

MCD expects storage to peak at Lockington, Taylorsville and Huffman dams today and at Englewood on Tuesday.

ExploreMenthol ban pitched as way to reduce racial disparities in tobacco harm

The river level has peaked in Piqua and Troy, but is expected to continue to rise slightly from Dayton to Hamilton.

MCD staff is continuing to monitor the river levels and will take action as needed. Staff closed the storm sewer floodgates in Piqua, Middletown and Hamilton. The floodgates are at the end of storm sewers and typically remain open. Staff close the floodgates to prevent the river from backing up into storm sewers and cities.

In Other News