Judge: Former Mason mayor, Ohio lawmaker can seek CPA license he lost after conviction

As the plaintiffs in the civil suit against former state lamaker Pete Beck seek donations his campaign made to OHROC, Beck is in the midst of appealing his 2015 13-count criminal conviction. Pictured is Beck listens to cross-examination testimony on May 20, 2015, as his defense attorney Chad Ziepfel, foreground, questions a witness.
As the plaintiffs in the civil suit against former state lamaker Pete Beck seek donations his campaign made to OHROC, Beck is in the midst of appealing his 2015 13-count criminal conviction. Pictured is Beck listens to cross-examination testimony on May 20, 2015, as his defense attorney Chad Ziepfel, foreground, questions a witness.

Credit: Michael D. Pitman

Credit: Michael D. Pitman

A Warren County judge said Thursday that  a former Mason mayor and Ohio lawmaker is allowed to again seek the CPA license he lost four years ago after being convicted on felony theft, perjury and securities-related charges.

Pete Beck, 66, of Mason, petitioned the Warren County Common Pleas Court for a Certificate of Qualification of Employment (CQE), which is the process for a person convicted of a felony or misdemeanor to apply to the court to lift the collateral sanction barring him or her from consideration of employment in a certain field.

Warren County Judge Timothy Tepe said Beck had suffered a collateral sanction, according to court documents filed Thursday morning.

 

Beck was convicted in June 2015 for his part in an investment scheme involving the companies Christopher Technologies and TML Consulting.

Beck was sentenced in August 2015 to four years in prison after being convicted of three theft counts, as well as seven perjury and three securities-related counts. The perjury and securities counts were overturned by the First District Court of Appeals in December 2016, and Beck was released from prison after serving 16 months.

The theft charges carried a one-year sentence.

Before his conviction, Beck was a certified public accountant for 24 years, but the case cost him his CPA license. In his petition to the court, Beck said his criminal record “makes it very difficult to find employment” and he is “hindered in my ability to find work without my CPA license.”

If his license is reinstated, Beck told the court he could open his own CPA firm. He also told the court the CQE “would further solidify that I am worthy of a potential client’s business.”