Representatives of Dayton Public Schools, Five Rivers Health Centers and the city of Dayton announce plans to open a student health center at an April media event. The center will be located in the newly named Roosevelt elementary school at 1923 W. Third St. JEREMY P. KELLEY / STAFF

Dayton in-school health clinic now set to open in early 2020

The clinic that Five Rivers Health Centers hoped to open this fall at Roosevelt Elementary is now on track for a January or February start date, said Dayton Public Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli.

The school board will vote Tuesday on both a memorandum of understanding and a lease agreement with Five Rivers, paving the way for the project to begin. The health center would be available to serve students in all Dayton Public Schools, then serve the general public after school hours, according to Lolli.

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“We started out with a target of late August or early September, then we had to iron out some of the MOU language — what the service hours are, who’s going to be where, how do we transport kids to and from the clinic?” Lolli said. “Those kind of logistical issues.”

Five Rivers spokeswoman Kim Bramlage confirmed Friday that the original plan is still in place — the center will feature three medical exam rooms staffed at least by a nurse practitioner, plus dental and vision services, as well as behavioral health services.

“We are looking at middle to end of January as our hopeful opening date,” Bramlage said. “It will all depend on how the construction goes once we start that process.”

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As a federally qualified health center, Five Rivers has grant funds to serve uninsured patients, and the group has been hoping to expand into schools. Their Trotwood school-based health center is slated to open in mid-November, according to Five Rivers officials.

Dayton Public Schools officials hope lessening student health problems, including asthma that is widespread in the student population, could lead to progress on absenteeism and academic troubles.

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