Centerville has appointed Holly Christmann as its new economic development administrator. Centerville leaders have announced several personnel changes, as city hall continues to look to fill key leadership positions.
Photo: CONTRIBUTED
Photo: CONTRIBUTED

Multiple Centerville employees have left city jobs in past year

MORE: Centerville makes personnel changes in city hall

In February, Jennifer Brumby resigned as the city’s human resources manager after serving less than a year. Her last day was March 22.

Brumby’s resignation brings to nine the number of department heads or assistants who have left Centerville City Hall since the beginning of 2018.

Brumby filled the position left vacant when Jennifer Wilder left in 2018 for a similar position with the city of Oakwood.

On March 29, Andrew Rodney gave his resignation as city planner and his last day will be April 12. He has been in the position since 2013, coming from the city of Dayton where he served as principal planner for more than four years. Prior to that, he was the regional planner for the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission.

Rodney said he “has no firm landing stop at this point,” as he maps out his next career move.

The city is seeking applications to fill his position. The application deadline is April 15, 2019.

Also in February, Franklin City Council appointed Cynthia Ryan as its new finance director. Ryan had served as Centerville’s assistant finance director since 2016. She said the new opportunity was “a good chance to move up and progress with my career.”

In March, Community Resource Manager Maureen Russell-Hodgson left the city took a similar job with Springboro. Russell-Hodgson spent 25 years in city hall.

Last year, Jonathan Hudson left as Centerville’s finance director to take the same position in Springboro. Hudson served as Centerville’s finance director for three years and assistant finance director for four years.

In September, Kristen Gopman left her position as assistant to the city manager in Centerville, which she had held for 12 years, and took the position of director of Parks and Recreation in Moraine.

Former Police Chief Bruce Robertson retired in February 2018, and Nathan Cahall left his position as economic development administrator to take the administrator position in Plain City.

City Manager Davis told council this week that the city is almost “up to speed,” with filling openings created in the past year.

Centerville already has found a replacement for Brumby — Rory Garrity, an attorney who worked as staff counsel for the Cincinnati Insurance Co. Garrity’s first day in her new position was April 4.

John Davis, who has been handling communication duties for the police department, will fill the position as Community Resource Manager on an interim basis, while continuing his duties with law enforcement.

On March 4, Laura Filaseta joined the city as Centerville’s first events coordinator.

Filaseta previously worked at Dayton Christian School as the same position according to Davis. She will also serve as volunteer coordinator for Centerville.

“I was responsible for a lot of the school’s activities and functions,” she said. “I am so excited to be working here and I know there is just great opportunities to be of service to the community.”

Centerville named Tyler Roark as finance director earlier this year as Hudson’s replacement.

MORE: 10 important stories that impacted Centerville in 2018

Holly Christmann was named the new economic development administrator to replace Cahall. Christmann comes to Centerville from Hamilton County, where she was employed for 22 years, serving the past five years as director of environmental services.

Last July, Centerville appointed Matt Brown to serve as the city’s police chief, and also named Mariah Butler Vogelgesang to the position of assistant city manager.

Brown is a 1993 graduate of Brookville High School and has been a member of the Centerville Police Department since 1998.

A native of Zanesville, Vogelgesang is a graduate of the University of Mary Washington and the University of Dayton School of Law.

MORE: 10 things to know about Centerville’s year-long celebration marking 50 years

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