West Carrollton is considering a change to beef up its law on dangerous dogs. FILE

Dog-on-dog mauling spurs West Carrollton plan to change animal law

Proposed ordinance updates will strengthen the city’s ability to have more authority over aggressive dogs, West Carrollton Police Chief Doug Woodard said.

The legislation “has been updated to allow us to address situations where dog attack dogs,” he said. “The only way that we can address that situation is if the attacking dog killed the other dog. And that was unacceptable.

“So our ordinance (would allow) us to take action if the dog attacks another dog and causes serious injury,” Woodard added.

The changes are being considered by West Carrollton City Council. They may be voted on next week.

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The proposal follows an August attack by two dogs on the small one owned by Paula Helms. The incident, occurring in Helms’ yard, resulted in the dog – Tobie – getting a leg amputated in the second time he was targeted by the other dogs, officials said.

The first occurred in 2018, officials said.

Under the proposal, a dangerous dog would be one “that, without provocation, has done any” of the following:

•Caused injury, “other than killing or serious injury,” to any person;

•Caused serious injury to another dog;

•Has been the subject of a third or subsequent violation.

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This would exempt police dogs, records show.

A certificate classifying a dog as dangerous would be issued by the Montgomery County auditor, and dog owners would be required to have proof of liability insurance, Woodard said.

In the case of her dog, Helms said, the county Animal Resource Center has filed dangerous dog paperwork, but the owners of the dogs have appealed.

But the proposed change, she said, will have far-reaching effects.

“I just think they’re doing (someone) awesome, making the changes that need to be made to protect the community,” Helms said.

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