Huber Heights acquires 80 acres of land

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The city of Huber Heights has acquired about 80 acres of land next to the Northpark Shopping Center that city leaders say they hope will lead to more economic development just north of Interstate 70.

The land — officially at 80.341 acres — was recently acquired by the city through its land reutilization program, which City Council passed in late 2013. The program allows the transition of vacant, property tax-delinquent properties.

The cost for Huber Heights to go through the process to acquire the land was $12,545, for court costs and legal fees. The previous owner was Wildcat Development, according to county records.

A listing found online listed the property at $225,000 an acre. It had been designed for Phase II of the Northpark Shopping Center.

The land is directly east of Gander Mountain — fronting I-70 — and goes north, along the back of the Northpark Shopping Center, which includes Kohl’s, Elder-Beerman, Marshalls and and Lowe’s.

“This piece of property is probably one of the best pieces of property within Montgomery County,” Councilman Mark Campbell said. “It’s one we’re confident we’ll market, sell and see developed.”

Councilman Ed Lyons, who spearheaded the land reutilization program, said the program applies to residential, commercial and industrial properties. A property must be at least two years delinquent on property taxes.

The last payment on the property came in 2006. According to the Montgomery County Auditor’s website, the previous owner was behind nearly $360,000 in property taxes.

“It literally is a win-win for the city,” Lyons said. “We’ll be able to sell that to a developer, and if nothing else, it will be developed sooner as opposed to later now that we have that as the principal owner. It will turn into a profitable, tax-paying development.”

The city of Huber Heights is marketing the property on its website at www.hhoh.org.

“As we continue to move forward in economic development, the city is making every effort possible to protect our taxpayers’ dollars,” City Manager Rob Schommer said in a release. “The results of this process provides a great asset for the city of Huber Heights, and will add to the economic base to provide for continued growth and stability of our community.”