Ohio officials say no way it can meet September medical marijuana program deadline

State officials say there’s no way to meet a September deadline to start Ohio’s medical marijuana program.

A building on Tonawanda Trail in Beavercreek will be the new home of Harvest of Ohio, a medical marijuana dispensary. 

>> Medical cannabis stores are coming to Ohio: 5 questions answered for you

But the state admitted this week it still has a ways to go with getting this program off the ground. 

“It’s drugs so people are going to be iffy about it,” said Ariana Goins. 

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Ever since this issue has been on the table, it has been divisive, with people in Beavercreek also on both sides of the issue. 

>> Where will you be able to buy medical marijuana in region?

“I think it’s a good thing if it’s for medical use,” said Randall Green. 

Still others had no idea a dispensary was on the way, close to busy shopping centers like The Greene. 

The city of Beavercreek earlier this year passed a six-month moratorium against medical marijuana businesses. It’s set to expire later this month. 

>> Here are all 21 health conditions that could qualify you for medical marijuana in Ohio

The reason the state said it won’t meet the September deadline is because it is still working on selecting and certifying hundreds of groups to grow or sell medical pot 

“I’m sure a lot of people would actually need it,” Goins said. 

With 55 other dispensaries across the buckeye state winning licenses from the Ohio Board of Pharmacy, including nine in the Miami Valley, Green said he doesn't understand why there would be a delay. 

>> Ohio announces first set of medical marijuana growers

“It shouldn’t be that much of a roadblock if other states are doing it. They should just learn from them,” he said. 

Last week, the first of 25 growers in Ohio received operation certificates, which means they can start cultivating marijuana. 

As for the business in Beavercreek, its plans would still need to comply with the city’s zoning code and be approved by the planning commission.

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