Site selection called ‘monumental step’ in schools proposal

The Van Cleve School on East Main Street in Troy at more than 100 years is the district’s oldest building with classrooms. It houses sixth graders. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
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The Van Cleve School on East Main Street in Troy at more than 100 years is the district’s oldest building with classrooms. It houses sixth graders. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Troy City Schools Board of Education’s agreement to purchase land just west of the city limits for a proposed elementary schools complex was called a “monumental step forward” by Doug Trostle, board president.

The purchase of 58.67 acres off Ohio 55 and Nashville Road in Concord Twp., OK’d by the board Aug. 14, was contingent on voter approval of a proposed bond issue and maintenance levy on the November ballot.

The board earlier this summer agreed to pursue two new prekindergarten through sixth-grade buildings on either the same or two sites. The buildings would have younger students in one area and older students in another with shared facilities such as cafeterias and gym space separating the sections.

The district currently has six elementary schools and a separate sixth-grade building.

Trostle said there will be continued conversations with the community to “determine what the best scenario might be of the buildings on the property.”

The board had discussed a possible construction project the past few years before this spring holding community meetings on options for what the board found to be the district’s greatest need of new elementary buildings. The bond issue includes some dollars for updates at the high school.

The district would seek to annex the property from the township to the city of Troy “There is land, but not what you thought,” Superintendent Eric Herman said of the search for available land across the community. The selected site is in the southwest sector of the community, a growth area.

The board was given a conceptual site layout featuring the buildings, parking areas, bus drop off location and other features. The drawing was provided by the district’s consultants from SHP and likely will change several times during the plan development process.

“I can’t emphasize enough it’s a conceptual drawing,” Herman said. The district is working with the Ohio School Facilities Commission, with the district eligible for 33 percent construction funding. The estimated project cost was set at $63.3 million with a $47.9 million local share.

The ballot issue seeks 4.61-mills for 30 years. The cost to the owner of a $100,000 home would be around $161 annually, according to the Miami County Auditor’s Office.

For more information on the project, visit the schools’ website at www.troy.k12.oh.us.

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