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University to open Trotwood satellite office

Central State University is planning a new satellite office in Trotwood.

The new location in the Trotwood Civic and Cultural Arts Center will bring agricultural programming to the northwest Montgomery County suburb.

RELATED: Trotwood receives grants to renovate Cultural Arts Center

“As a land-grant institution, our Extension and Research activities bring vital and practical information to agricultural producers, small business owners, consumers, families, and young people,” Dr. Alton B. Johnson, Central State dean and director of College of Science and Engineering 1890 Land-Grant Programs.

Central State President Cynthia Jackson-Hammond and Trotwood Mayor Mary McDonald signed the official memorandum of understanding today to mark the new partnership.

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“With the City of Trotwood being two-thirds rural as well as the number of alumni who reside in our community, it was only a natural fit that we partner with Central State University to bring agricultural programming to the City,” McDonald said.

Jackson-Hammond said at the signing ceremony that part of the university’s goal is to support young people, who will then be more likely to support their community in return.

“When you make an influence or impact on young people, they tend to have a greater commitment to their community. They don’t go off looking for greener grass in another community or another city or another state, because they have now become invested in their community and that’s the kind of interest we hope we will develop,” said Jackson-Hammond.

The community center where the satellite office will be located is set to be reopened after being closed for eight years after it underwent a renovation with the help of more than $400,000 in state and county funds.

McDonald said previously that the city officals wanted to attract organizations to use the space after the renovation in order to bring more services to the community.

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