Miamisburg to see new renovations, home growth this year

Larry Niswonger, left and Brad Davis tuck point the brick of the old Suttman Men's and Boys' Wear building in downtown Miamisburg in October 2020. The building is being renovated into a brewery, restaurant and residential apartments.
Larry Niswonger, left and Brad Davis tuck point the brick of the old Suttman Men's and Boys' Wear building in downtown Miamisburg in October 2020. The building is being renovated into a brewery, restaurant and residential apartments.

Credit: JIM NOELKER

Credit: JIM NOELKER

Miamisburg has several high-profile projects on tap for 2021, including renovations to historic and recreational buildings, construction of the first residential developments in two decades and improvements to a 90-year-old bridge.

Perhaps the biggest project from an economic development standpoint is the renovation of the former site of Suttman Men’s and Boys’ Wear for more than a century before it closed in 2013.

Dayton-area commercial real estate development company Simplify Real Estate is spending $2.2 million to renovate the two-story, 12,610-square-foot historic building. There are no proposed uses for the building yet, but the developer is looking at a mixed use retail/residential development, which would include a brewpub to open on the first floor and for apartments units to be offered on the second and third floors.

Because it is “literally in the heart of downtown,” the building is a staple for the city, said Miamisburg Mayor Michelle Collins.

“To know that we could have lost the building due to disrepair ... was just too much to really think about,” Collins said. “To have a developer that believes in Miamisburg enough to spend the money and the resources to restore that building to the way it was in its former glory just means the world to us.”

ExploreBuilding that once housed popular men’s clothing store to get $2.2M renovation

The renovated building at 24-32 S. Main St. is only part of downtown Miamisburg’s economic resurgence. Thrive at Market Square, a recently launched small business incubator, is expected to help more entrepreneurs to open for business throughout this year, joining several new storefronts that have opened in the city’s downtown area or recently announced plans to do so.

Set to launch construction this year are two new housing plans that will add more than 250 homes combined in the city’s southern end, something Collins said would be the most new homes built in Miamisburg in about 20 years.

Site preparation already can be seen at the Aberdeen subdivision, which will bring new homes by Fischer Homes to a 42-acre site off Miamisburg Springboro Road next to Pipestone Golf Course and near the Austin Boulevard interchange.

Also starting construction this year is the first phase of the Deer Valley subdivision, an Oberer Development and Ryan Homes project on 86.6 acres off Benner Road near the Mound Business Park.

Construction of the new homes will help the city retain existing residents and attract new homeowners from outside the city who might otherwise decide to live in neighboring communities, Collins said. The last home construction was at Sydney’s Bend, which was constructed in the early 2000s and is “a small subdivision compared to what’s being planned now,” she said.

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Also slated for Miamisburg in 2021 are improvements to the Ninth Street bridge, a 60-foot span built in 1930 and reconstructed in 1970. City officials previously said the bridge is structurally deficient. Miamisburg will cover $700,000 of construction costs, with the federal government providing a $546,000 grant.

Design work the Ninth Street bridge project will be completed this year with the bids going out in November and a 3-to-6 month construction period after that, according to City Manager Keith Johnson.

This year also will see the reopening of the city’s Sycamore Trails Aquatic Center in Miamisburg, which did not open in 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. During the closure, the city launched various structural and aesthetic improvements, including “deep maintenance” to its approximately two-decade-old pool and the addition of newer water features, such as sprayers, Collins said.

“It’s like anything else: it has to be maintained and it has to be kept current,” she said. “It’s going to only really improve the venue and keep it up to date with the way it should be.”

ExploreBrewpub-restaurant coming as part of $2.2M revamp of historic downtown Miamisburg building

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