Ohio lawmakers react to U.S. action against Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with his President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the G20 Leaders Summit in Hangzhou on September 5, 2016. ALEXEI DRUZHININ/AFP/Getty Images
Caption
Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with his President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the G20 Leaders Summit in Hangzhou on September 5, 2016. ALEXEI DRUZHININ/AFP/Getty Images

Ohio lawmakers reacted differently to President Barack Obama’s actions sanctioning Russia for its role in interfering witht he 2016 presidential election.

ExploreRELATED: Putin says Russia won’t expel diplomats; Trump offers praise

Russian President Vladimir Putin said no U.S. diplomats will be ousted in retaliation for Obama’s decision to impose sanctions and expel Russian diplomats over allegations of Russian meddling in the American presidential election. The Russian leader said he reserves the right to hit back in the future.

ExploreFollow @Ohio_Politics

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Caption
Obama sanctions

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said “there must be consequences for Russia’s interference with our election. Today’s action sends a clear message that the United States will not tolerate threats to our democracy and we will protect the American people and our institutions from being undermined by the Russian government.”

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said while he supports President Barack Obama’s decision to impose sanctions on Russia for hacking e-mails from the Democratic National Committee, he called the U.S. actions a “belated and reactive response to a steadily worsening threat is unlikely to deter future aggression.”

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Caption
Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Credit: John Minchillo

Credit: John Minchillo

Portman said “the problem of Russian influence operations is far greater than just the election hacking and requires a stronger and more proactive U.S. strategy, something I have been calling for the past few years. Russia was waging an information war against the United States and its allies long before the presidential election highlighted the danger these efforts pose to our democratic institutions and ideals.”

Congressional Republicans were quick to back Obama’s decision, even though they said the president should have acted sooner.

“Over and over again, Russia has made clear of its intention to wreak havoc around the world,” said Columbus-area Rep. Pat Tiberi, R-Genoa Twp. “Now the Obama administration is finally responding forcefully to this aggression.”

“But what took so long?” Tiberi asked. “Going forward, we must continue to send the signal that we will not tolerate foreign hacking on our nation. I continue to support the appropriate bipartisan committee investigations into Russia’s cyberattacks.”

Rep. Bill Johnson, R-Marietta, said “today’s action is positive, but long overdue. In 2014, President Obama warned Russian President Vladimir Putin that ‘there would be costs’ if Russia invaded Ukraine. Shortly after that statement, Vladimir Putin thumbed his nose at President Obama and the world watched as the Russians invaded Ukraine.”

Other Democrats were quick to praise Obama. “Actions have consequences and today’s announcement by the Obama administration makes that abundantly clear to the Russian government,” said Columbus-area Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Jefferson Twp, a Dayton native. “Every American should be greatly troubled by Russia’s interference in our presidential election, including President-elect Trump.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

ExploreTweets by Ohio_Politics