Races for four Congressional incumbents called, incumbents reelected

Republican incumbent Mike Turner won re-election to Congress, beating Democratic challenger Desiree Tims, according to unofficial results.

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Republican incumbent Mike Turner won re-election to Congress, beating Democratic challenger Desiree Tims, according to unofficial results.

Races were called for Republican incumbents Mike Turner, Warren Davidson, Steve Chabot and Jim Jordan, beating three Democratic women on Tuesday, according to unofficial results as of 11:30 p.m. Tuesday.

The Associated Press reported that Turner, R-Dayton; Jordan, R-Urbana; Davidson, R-Troy; and Chabot R-Cincinnati, were re-elected over challengers Desiree Tims, Shannon Freshour, Vanessa Enoch and Kate Schroder respectively.

Turner, the 60-year-old former Dayton mayor, has served 18 years in Congress. He campaigned on his expertise in national security and defense, saying he is well positioned to protect jobs and programs at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

Turner said in a written statement: “I will continue to work to build WPAFB, grow our local economy, and preserve health care coverage, including for those with pre-existing conditions. I will always advocate for our community, and thank the voters for their support in this election.”

In a video posted to her Facebook page, Tims told supporters she called Turner and conceded the race. It’s not the outcome she hoped for, but she’s proud of the race they ran, Tims said.

“Together we showed Ohio and the country that this Congressional seat is competitive,” she said, “and the granddaughter of sharecroppers and a working class woman from the Westside of Dayton can run a powerful Congressional campaign.”

Jordan, who was first elected in 2006, has a national profile as the co-founder of the conservative Freedom Caucus and raised just over $16 million for the race against Freshour.

Schroder, 43, is a public health professional in Cincinnati while Chabot, 67, has held the Congressional seat for 24 of the last 26 years.

The race attracted more than $12 million in fundraising on both sides and was considered one of the most competitive congressional races in Ohio.

These results are expected to change as more ballots are counted through Nov. 18. We will continue to update these results as more ballots are counted.

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