Community Gem: Centerville man helps area students, military veterans overcome trauma

Dan Loofboro, who works with the Building Bridges program, is flanked by Montgomery County Juvenile Court Judges Helen Wallace and Anthony Capizzi. CONTRIBUTED
Caption
Dan Loofboro, who works with the Building Bridges program, is flanked by Montgomery County Juvenile Court Judges Helen Wallace and Anthony Capizzi. CONTRIBUTED

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

CENTERVILLE — Dan Loofboro said he struggled in high school, but his battle ultimately helped him — and those he now works with — overcome obstacles.

Loofboro manages Spectrum New Beginnings, a nonprofit which brings free yoga and meditation to local schools, military veterans and various Dayton-area organizations, said Holly Studebaker.

Studebaker nominated Loofboro, a certified instructor, as a Dayton Daily News Community Gem because, in part, he is “passionate about healing and helping others live their healthiest and best lives.”

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Loofboro, a 54-year-old Centerville resident, works with schools in that city, Dayton, Greene County, Kettering and Middletown, as well as those at the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center and in Montgomery County Juvenile Court.

The Stebbins High School graduate said he seeks to help post-traumatic stress disorder trauma victims of all ages. But he identifies quite a bit with the youngsters he works with because of shared experiences.

“School was really hard for me. And that’s actually helping me with the kids these days because I know where they’re coming from,” he said.

“Rather than telling the kids how to study, we teach them how to study. How to calm the mind,” Loofboro added.

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“Dan is one of the most passionate and altruistic individuals in our community who cares about making an impact in children and adults from all walks of life,” according to Studebaker.

Loofboro said he become involved with helping others after his wife, Terri, took her own life in 2011.

“I started having PTSD really bad…and that led me to have an empathy for war veterans and for kids living in trauma,” he said.

“It just became my passion,” Loofboro added. “It’s just what I love to do. So it doesn’t really feel like working.”

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