Redlining quilt art piece on display in Montgomery County Admin building

The six-foot square quilt, created by Shannon Naik and Carroll Schleppi of the Miami Valley Art Quilt Network, is titled “Equity 21: Redlining Dayton”, and was commissioned by Sinclair Community College for its Equity 21 Summit held in November | PROVIDED

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The six-foot square quilt, created by Shannon Naik and Carroll Schleppi of the Miami Valley Art Quilt Network, is titled “Equity 21: Redlining Dayton”, and was commissioned by Sinclair Community College for its Equity 21 Summit held in November | PROVIDED

A quilted art piece depicting a redlined map of Dayton in 1937 is on display in the Montgomery County Administration building, unveiled by county auditor Karl Keith at an event on May 18.

The six-foot square quilt, created by Shannon Naik and Carroll Schleppi of the Miami Valley Art Quilt Network, is titled “Equity 21: Redlining Dayton”, and was commissioned by Sinclair Community College for its Equity 21 Summit held in November.

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Naik and Schleppi used a copy of a 1937 map of Dayton printed by mapping staff in the auditor’s office as a template, then invited residents of the redlined areas to write their thoughts on the fabric background of the quilt.

Written thoughts range from responses like “Sad Disgusted Angry” or “We all bleed red” to calls for action like “Be better than those before us” and “Invest in Dayton for youth.”

Schleppi and Naik said the piece took more than 600 hours to complete.

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The quilt will be on exhibit during normal business hours on the third floor of the Montgomery County Administration Building until August.

Redlining is a now-illegal practice of denying home loans, mortgages and other home financing services to residents of minority neighborhoods that was commonly used by financial institutions and governments in the 20th century.

In a release, Keith said he hopes the exhibit will help inform the public about the history of redlining, later adding that the practice prevented many minority families from owning a home or building wealth.

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