Who voted for Trump, Biden? Area city, township results vary dramatically

Long lines greeted voters at the Montgomery County Board of Elections on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, as early voting began for the November general election. Early in-person voting in the state lasts until Nov. 2 and absentee ballots can be dropped off at the board office until Election Day, which is Nov. 3. In Montgomery County, registered voters can cast their ballot at the board of elections located at 451 W. Third St. in Dayton. MARSHALL GORBY/STAFF
Long lines greeted voters at the Montgomery County Board of Elections on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, as early voting began for the November general election. Early in-person voting in the state lasts until Nov. 2 and absentee ballots can be dropped off at the board office until Election Day, which is Nov. 3. In Montgomery County, registered voters can cast their ballot at the board of elections located at 451 W. Third St. in Dayton. MARSHALL GORBY/STAFF

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Kettering was closest to 50-50, Dayton and Oakwood backed Biden, Beavercreek and Troy went for Trump.

By relatively close margins, Donald Trump won Ohio’s presidential vote, 53-45, and Joe Biden won Montgomery County, 50-48. But a Dayton Daily News analysis shows individual cities and townships in the region had wildly varying results, from a small township where Trump got 88% of the vote, to a village where Biden won by a 92-7 ratio.

All over the Dayton area, the most lopsided support for Trump came from small villages and townships, while larger suburbs and cities either supported Trump by smaller margins, or in fewer cases, voted for Biden, according to results from local county boards of election.

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Trump completely dominated all local counties other than Montgomery, winning 59-39 in Greene County, 70-28 in northern Warren County, 71-27 in Miami County and 78-21 in Preble County.

Those areas didn’t have a single city, township or village where the race was truly close, with 52 of 54 jurisdictions going for Trump by at least 10 percentage points. The other two were Yellow Springs at 92-7 for Biden, and neighboring Miami Twp. (Greene County) at 55-43 Biden.

In 13 tiny Greene and Miami county communities, Trump won more than 80 percent of the vote, including Jefferson Twp., in the far southeastern corner of Greene County, where the vote ratio was 88-11.

Montgomery County

While Montgomery County’s overall vote totals were close, continuing its reputation as a mirror for the nation, 22 of the county’s 29 cities, villages and townships were blowouts — some for Trump, some for Biden.

The strongest Biden support was in Trotwood (82-17), Dayton (69-28), Harrison Twp. (67-31), Jefferson Twp. (64-35) and Oakwood (62-36).

The strongest Trump support was clustered in the many small rural communities on the western edge of the county. All four townships there, plus Farmersville, New Lebanon, Brookville, Germantown and Phillipsburg, voted 70-80% for Trump.

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In fact, half of the 29 communities in Montgomery County voted 60% or more for Trump. But almost all of those were smaller places — those 14 areas combined delivered about 36,000 votes for Trump, while the city of Dayton itself delivered 36,000 Biden votes.

There were seven communities where the vote was fairly close. Of those, Kettering, Englewood, Centerville, Washington Twp, Huber Heights backed Trump, while Clayton and the Page Manor area near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base supported Biden.

Huber Heights, Centerville and Washington Twp. — three of the largest suburbs in the Dayton area, ranging from middle class to wealthy communities — all favored Trump 53-45, the exact same margin by which he won the statewide vote.

Kettering was the closest to 50-50 of any community in the Miami Valley, favoring Trump 50-48. The city of Clayton almost exactly matched the national vote ratio, going 51-47 for Biden.

Big vs. small places

Sparsely populated Ohio communities were the most likely sites for Trump landslides, while communities with more people living side-by-side were likely to skew a little closer to the middle, or toward Biden.

** Statewide, all six of Ohio’s big-city counties went for Biden, while 30 of the 31 counties with the highest Trump vote percentage had populations under 50,000.

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** Regionally, the most populous local county (Montgomery) narrowly favored Biden, while the smaller surrounding counties strongly supported Trump.

** Locally, 140,000-population Dayton went overwhelmingly for Biden, and the other five communities of 30,000 or more people all backed Trump, but with 50-56% of the vote. All 34 local villages or townships where Trump got at least 75% of the vote were places with less than 4,000 total votes cast.

Among Greene County’s 23 jurisdictions, the 11 smallest communities were the 11 with the highest Trump support, ranging from 72% to 88%. The two largest cities in the county, Beavercreek and Fairborn, backed Trump at 56% and 54%.

Voter turnout

While voter turnout was comparatively high everywhere, it tended to be higher in townships than in cities, and the very peak came in some very small townships. Elizabeth Twp. in Miami County, Cedar Twp. in Greene County and Wayne Twp. in Warren County were at the top, with 86.4 to 87.0% turnout.

Among slightly larger communities, Clearcreek Twp. (86.2%), Oakwood (85.2%), Beavercreek Twp. (84.9%), and Sugarcreek Twp. (84.1%) had high turnout.

The only two areas with voter turnout below 60%, according to county boards of election, were the small Page Manor area near Wright-Patt (52.9%) and Cedarville (53.6%). The city of Dayton was next at 60.1%.

Odds and ends

** In most jurisdictions, between 1% and 2% of all voters chose someone other than Trump or Biden. The biggest outlier was Cedarville, where 4.1% did so, almost all of them picking libertarian Jo Jorgensen.

** Some next-door-neighbor communities had very different voting results. Harrison Twp. and Vandalia share a border on Stop 8 Road. But Harrison Twp. went 67-31 for Biden, while Vandalia went 63-35 for Trump.

Highest Trump vote percentage, any community

87.90 — Jefferson Twp. (Greene)

85.29 — Bowersville (Greene)

84.71 — Potsdam (Miami)

82.64 — Newberry Twp. (Miami)

82.59 — Ludlow Falls (Miami)

*******

Highest Biden vote percentage, any community

91.80 — Yellow Springs (Greene)

82.12 — Trotwood (Montgomery)

69.50 — Dayton (Montgomery)

67.21 — Harrison Twp. (Montgomery)

64.02 — Jefferson Twp. (Montgomery)

*******

30 largest communities, by rank of Trump vote %

74.40 — Franklin Twp. (Warren)

72.86 — Franklin (Warren)

72.24 — Turtlecreek Twp. (Warren)

71.12 — Clearcreek Twp. (Warren)

68.72 — Tipp City (Miami)

68.55 — Piqua (Miami)

65.85 — Lebanon (Warren)

64.87 — Butler Twp. (Montgomery)

64.63 — Troy (Miami)

63.91 — Miamisburg (Montgomery)

63.32 — Vandalia (Montgomery)

62.65 — Springboro (Warren)

62.38 — Sugarcreek Twp. (Greene)

62.03 — Xenia (Greene)

61.34 — Beavercreek Twp. (Greene)

60.27 — Riverside (Montgomery)

57.74 — West Carrollton (Montgomery)

56.27 — Miami Twp. (Montgomery)

56.20 — Beavercreek (Greene)

53.98 — Fairborn (Greene)

53.17 — Washington Twp. (Montgomery)

53.13 — Huber Heights (Montgomery)

53.03 — Centerville (Montgomery)

51.80 — Englewood (Montgomery)

50.07 — Kettering (Montgomery)

47.20 — Clayton (Montgomery)

36.20 — Oakwood (Montgomery)

30.95 — Harrison Twp. (Montgomery)

28.37 — Dayton (Montgomery)

16.72 — Trotwood (Montgomery)

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